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I know that JavaScript moves all variable declarations to the top of the function. However, I was expecting same result in both console.log() below. However, I get NaN in first case and 4 in second.

Can someone explain this? I know there are similar questions already asked and answered on StackOverflow, but this question has something to do with the function definition. e.g., Does JavaScript move function variables to the end of variable declarations?

var doB = function() { return a+1};
var b = a+1;
var a = 3;
console.log(b); // NaN
console.log(doB()); // 4
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Because of hoisting, this is what your code technically looks like:

var doB, b, a;
doB = function() {
    return a+1;
};
b = a + 1;
a = 3;
console.log(b); // NaN
console.log(doB()); // 4

Because the code is executed from top to bottom, when b is initialized to a + 1, a hasn't been initialized to anything yet (it's undefined). So really, b tries to be set as undefined + 1, which is NaN

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After the variables get hoisted, your code basically acts like this:

var doB;
var a;
var b;

doB = function() {
    return a + 1
};

b = a + 1;
a = 3;

console.log(b); // NaN
console.log(doB()); // 4

Since a hasn't been defined when you define b, b is set to NaN, as undefined + 1 === NaN.

a is in the scope of the function, so by the time you call it, a already has a value of 3.

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The JavaScript Scope

I hope to use the most correct terminology I know at the moment and I also know it is not fully correct. I'm not any javascript guru but this matter you are asking about is related to the JavaScript Scope. You can find a lots of articles about this topic and also some Q&A on SO too like this one i found with examples

Step by step

I will try to reproduce line by line what does your snipnet. Please comment if you note a wrong term somewhere, i like to learn always i can :D

line 1

var doB = function() { return a+1};

means

Store a variable named "doB" on the current scope, assign its content to an anonymous function.

so...

a does not matter for now.


line 2

var b = a+1;

means

Store a variable named b on the current scope, assign its content to a new Integer(1) in addition to variable a.

so...

At this moment a is undefined because it isn't declared in the current scope, neither other scope accessible from this one. Operation undefined + a equals NaN. a is assigned NaN as value.


line 3

var a = 3;

means

Store a variable named a on the current scope, assign its content to a new Integer(3)

so...

Now we have a variable a that stores an integer.


line 4

console.log(b);

Outputs NaN because b actually is NaN.


line 5

console.log( doB() );

means

Call the function console.log with the value returned by calling the function doB with no arguments as the first argument.

so...

doB is called and returns: a+1

which means

new Integer(1) in addition to variable a. a doesn't exist on the function local scope but it exists on an scope accesible within the function. The value is taken from there, which actually is 3. Console outputs 4.

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a is undefined when you try to add 1 to it while assigning it to b.

var b = undefined+1; // = NaN
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