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I'm writing a Facebook app, and I'm trying to find out how to detect when the iFrame DOM is ready, and when the iFrame has completely loaded. I do not believe that window.fbAsyncInit() is sufficient, because that fires when the FB API has loaded. I'm specifically looking for the equivalent of jQuery(document).ready() and jQuery(window).load(), but it must work in the Facebook iFrame that my page is located in.

Edit: Most replies seem to reference document ready, but no one has even mentioned window load. I am interested knowing both, not just one or the other. The window load equivalent is actually more important in my case, since I have some large graphics on the page that must be fully loaded before they can be manipulated.

Edit 2: Upon further investigation, the answer may be to simply wrap jQuery(document).ready() in window.fbAsyncInit(), or use jQuery(window).load(). My initial testing showed these methods were not working as expected. The page I'm working on has some heavy JS, and it turns out that there are a number of async loads on the page that caused my tests to be invalid. jQuery(document).ready() wrapped in window.fbAsyncInit(), and jQuery(window).load() appear to be the correct methods.

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1  
Since the iframe is for a different domain, you wont be able to tap into its "window", so youll have to use some API feature –  Ian May 4 '13 at 3:24
1  
What Ian says is true. Why can't you just use doc ready in your JavaScript in the page loaded in the iFrame? –  SpYk3HH May 15 '13 at 22:18
    
@SpYk3HH In my initial testing, I had some inconsistent results with event firing. I suspect that I could use doc ready wrapped in api ready. –  JMack May 17 '13 at 16:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use a normal jQuery on document ready function, there's nothing preventing you from using that, it will work like normal. The only problem you may run into is if your code relies on the facebook js sdk being loaded, because you're using the async method there is no guarantee it will be available on page load.

So, I actually recommend not using the async method (especially in canvas apps), else you basically need to put all your application code that relies on the facebook sdk inside the 'fbAsyncInit' function.

<body>
    <div id="fb-root"></div>
    <script src="//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js"></script>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        jQuery(function(){
            // ... your 'on document ready' code
        });
        FB.init({
            appId                   : 'XXXXXX',
            status                  : true,
            cookie                  : true,
            xfbml                   : true,
            oauth                   : true,
            frictionlessRequests    : true
        });
        FB.Canvas.setAutoGrow();
        jQuery(function(){
            // ... more 'on document ready' code
        });
    </script>
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You can actually use FB API async loading in combination with window.fbAsyncInit to determine when the API has loaded. Wrapping a jQuery(document).ready() in a window.fbAsyncInit function would accomplish this. –  JMack May 17 '13 at 16:16

You can try little jquery lib - https://github.com/ntotten/jquery-fb

$(document).ready(function() {

   // Add the function to run after FB is initialized
   $(document).on('fb:initialized', function() {
     FB.getLoginStatus(fbAuthStatusChange);
   });
   $(document).fb('youappid');

});
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I'm trying to find out how to detect when the iFrame DOM is ready, and when the iFrame has completely loaded. I do not believe that window.fbAsyncInit() is sufficient, because that fires when the FB API has loaded.

If you put the script element that loads the SDK asynchronously at the very end of your body element, then DOM should be ready - ready enough - when the fbAsyncInit event fires.

If you think that's not enough, there is an easy more general way to do something only when two events have fired - by incrementing a simple counter:

var howManyOfUsHaveFired = 0;

function doMyShit() {
  if(howManyOfUsHaveFired < 2) {
    return; // i don't want to do shit already
  }
  // now I will do shit
}

$(function() {
  ++howManyOfUsHaveFired;
  doMyShit();
});

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
  FB.init(...);
  ++howManyOfUsHaveFired;
  doMyShit();
}
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You could also use a jQuery deferred object to accomplish this without a global counter and hard coded number of events. –  JMack May 17 '13 at 16:07

As I understand you need two things before running some code of yours. These are:

  1. Your page needs to be ready.
  2. Facebook API JS is downloaded and initialized.

Unfortunately, I was not able to find an easy way to detect if Facebook API is fully initalized. (Since FB.init is async you can't assume lines bellow it works as init done.)

As my experiment Facebook functions that have callback and are called after FB.init waits until async FB.init is completed. (Please note that auth.statusChange doesn't fire in some cases.)

So does something like this work for you? You can use allready event of window for your needs.

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">

window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({appId: "238797476172233"});

    FB.getLoginStatus(function(response) {
        /* at this point you know that you can use FB API's. */
        $().ready(function() {
          /* at this point you also know that your document is ready. */
          $(window).trigger("allready", [response]);
        });
    });
    FB.Canvas.setAutoGrow();
};

$(window).bind("allready", function() {
   /* optionally you can use e and response as function parameters */   
   alert("now I am sure that both page and FB API's are initialized. I can do anything in this callback!");   
});
</script>

JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/ubenzer/5y6fF/ (I added JSFiddle URL to my dummy app's domain but if it doesn't work, check the console and notify me please.)

Besides these, you don't have any "non-api way" to understand if Facebook is loaded as Ian commented out.

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This looks like the solution: https://developers.facebook.com/docs/reference/javascript/FB.Canvas.setDoneLoading/

After some testing I do believe this does what's needed:

<script type="text/javascript" src="https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" charset="utf-8">
window.fbAsyncInit = function() {
    FB.init({
         appId: 'xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx', 
         status: true, 
         cookie: true, 
         xfbml: true
    });

    FB.Canvas.setDoneLoading( function() {
        // Put code here that you want executed after page is done loading.
        console.log("done");
    });
}
</script>  
share|improve this answer
    
The function name is confusing, and so is the example. If you read closely, this function is called manually, at any time desired, to report when your application is ready. It is not called by the API when the page has fully loaded. If you clarify this in your answer, I'll definitely +1 you since this distinction is important. –  JMack May 12 '13 at 16:44
    
I've updated my answer. –  Tim Duncklee May 13 '13 at 7:41

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