Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is it not possible to chain pattern matching constructs? For instance, the following is legal, if nonsensical,

val a = ADT(5)

val b = a match {
  case ADT(a) if a > 4 => ADT(a * 3)
  case ADT(a) => ADT(a + 1)
} 
b match {
  case ADT(a) if a > 13 => doSomething(a)
  case _ => {}
}

but the following is not:

a match {
  case ADT(a) if a > 4 => ADT(a * 3)
  case ADT(a) => ADT(a + 1)
} match {
  case ADT(a) if a > 13 => doSomething(a)
  case _ => {}
}

I suspect it's because I shouldn't be doing it in the first place, but in principle I don't see why it's not legal.

share|improve this question
4  
(a match { .. }) match { .. } will work. –  user2246674 May 4 '13 at 4:55

2 Answers 2

Yes it should work, because (almost) everything in Scala is an expression and every expression can be used as a pattern match.

In this case the pattern match is an expression, so it can be used by another "chained" pattern match. But the compiler doesn't like it.

Giving the compiler a little hint with parentheses helps:

case class ADT(value: Int)

val a = ADT(5)

(a match {
  case ADT(a) if a > 4 => ADT(a * 3)
  case ADT(a) => ADT(a + 1)
}) match {
  case ADT(a) if a > 13 => println(a)
  case _ => {}
}
share|improve this answer
    
I stumbled upon the parentheses workaround as well, but I don't understand why it's necessary here but not necessary with something like val a = if(false) 6 else if (true) if(true) 5 else 3 else 2 –  Carl Summers May 4 '13 at 5:11
    
@CarlSummers the compiler can only infer so much. It's just order of operations. When in doubt (you, or the compiler) get explicit. (I'm new to Scala actually but this is one of the things I love about it.) –  seafangs Aug 13 '13 at 12:11

Your intuition is correct; it's not nonsense—normally you would be able to chain infix operators in such a way, without parentheses (as other users have suggested). Indeed, match used to be implemented as a method—and worked as an infix operator (left-associative by default)—so your alternate syntax would have worked. However, in Scala 2.5, match was made a special language construct instead of a method. Unfortunately, I don't know why that was done, but that is the reason: match is not an infix operator, despite seeming so.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.