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Following code compiles just fine under Visual Studio 2012 Express, Windows 8

But on my preferred platform, Eclipse Juno, GCC 4.2 on OS X I receive the following error:

../src/Test.cpp:20: error: 'std::istream& TestNS::operator>>(std::istream&, TestNS::Test&)' should have been declared inside 'TestNS'

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

using std::istream;

namespace TestNS
{
class Test
{
    friend istream &operator>>(istream &in, Test &value);

public:
    Test(double real, double image);

private:
    double real;
    double image;
    void initialize(double real, double image);

};
}

#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include "Header.h"

using std::istream;
using namespace TestNS;

TestNS::Test::Test(double real = 0.0, double image = 0.0) : real(real), image(image)
{

}

void TestNS::Test::initialize(double real,  double image)
{
this->real = real;
this->image = image;
}

istream& TestNS::operator>> (istream &in, TestNS::Test &value)
{
value.real = 10.0;
value.image = 10.0;

return in;

}

int main()
{

}

Any assistance would be most helpful. Working on assignment for school project.

share|improve this question
    
TestNS is not the class, it is the namespace in the header file, professor indicates this is needed. –  Joe Pitz May 4 '13 at 4:36
    
assignment indicates that must be friend function. –  Joe Pitz May 4 '13 at 4:37
    
without TestNS:: function is global function not friend function, Code compiles under Windows, Visual Studio, but not Eclipse GCC OS X –  Joe Pitz May 4 '13 at 4:42
    
it DOES compile under OS X with GCC 4.2 –  meyumer May 4 '13 at 4:52
    
I rebuilt an entirely new project and still does not work, Paths and Symbols, include path is set to: /usr/include/c++/4.2.1. –  Joe Pitz May 4 '13 at 6:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It appears that GCC is correct in giving the error. In your example, the friend declaration of operator>> does specify that operator>> will be a member of TestNS, but it doesn't actually declare it there. You still need a declaration of operator>> inside TestNS before you can define it outside of TestNS:

namespace TestNS
{
    class Test
    {
        friend istream &operator>>(istream &in, Test &value);

    public:
        Test(double real, double image);

    private:
        double real;
        double image;
        void initialize(double real, double image);

    };

    istream &operator>>(istream &in,Test &value); // need this
}

Now this is ok:

istream& TestNS::operator>> (istream &in, TestNS::Test &value)
{
    value.real = 10.0;
    value.image = 10.0;        
    return in;    
}

The relevant part of the standard is 7.3.1.2 p2 (for C++03):

Members of a named namespace can also be defined outside that namespace by explicit qualification of the name being defined, provided that the entity being defined was already declared in the namespace...

The next paragraph indicates (although somewhat indirectly) that although the friend declaration inside the class does make the function a member of the namespace, it does not actually declare it there, since a separate declaration is necessary for the function's name to become visible within the namespace:

If a friend declaration in a non-local class first declares a class or function, the friend class or function is a member of the innermost enclosing namespace. The name of the friend function is not found by simple name lookup until a matching declaration is provided in that namespace scope (either before or after the class declaration granting friendship).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Vaughn, Awesome reference provided. –  Joe Pitz May 4 '13 at 7:36

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