Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok so the problem is, I have a list with N given lines, like this:

4.96035894  2.94014535  9.71651378 On
8.37470259  9.08139103 10.23145322 Off
5.73085411  4.21656546  9.98718707 On
6.40892867  9.44195654  8.83707549 On
4.26065784  3.74966832  7.89520829 On
8.89601431  9.84208918  9.63054539 On
9.10538764  8.58408119 10.87454882 On
6.21494725  4.61164407  9.08378204 Off
7.62256424  9.59449339 10.84506558 Off
6.49210768  4.03768151 10.75221925 Off
5.04079861  4.99362253 10.34349177 Off
...

The objective is to find the X (X < N) lines with lowest value in the third field (it could be easily extended to any given field, but let's focus on the third) and change the fourth field (which is always a string) to On/Off depending of an argument called by the user, i.e. if the argument is On change to On and if it is Off then change to Off.

In the above example if for instance I wanted to change to Off the 3 rows with lowest third value, the output would be:

4.96035894  2.94014535  9.71651378 On
8.37470259  9.08139103 10.23145322 Off
5.73085411  4.21656546  9.98718707 On
6.40892867  9.44195654  8.83707549 Off // this row is changed
4.26065784  3.74966832  7.89520829 Off // this row is changed
8.89601431  9.84208918  9.63054539 On
9.10538764  8.58408119 10.87454882 On
6.21494725  4.61164407  9.08378204 Off // this row is changed
7.62256424  9.59449339 10.84506558 Off
6.49210768  4.03768151 10.75221925 Off
5.04079861  4.99362253 10.34349177 Off
...

I think I could do for the specific case of X=1, the lowest-value row, but I don't know how to extend to an arbitrary X. Maybe an X-sized array filling and being edited while going through the list?

share|improve this question
2  
So, what have you tried so far to do this yourself? What specifically can't you manage? –  Mat May 4 '13 at 10:21
    
Can you give an example on how your expected output should look like? –  hek2mgl May 4 '13 at 10:25
    
show us what you were doing for X=1, we will try to extend that one for your help –  abasu May 4 '13 at 11:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Interesting problem, you need to be clever with arrays for this:

BEGIN {
    if (!x)                           # If x wasn't set using -v default is 3
        x=3
    if (!field)                       # If field wasn't set using -v default is 3
        field=3
}
{
    lines[NR]=$0                                    # Store each line in an array
    sort[NR]=$field                                 # Store the field in an array
    field_a[$field]=$0                              # Line lookup on field 
}
END{
    asort(sort)                                     # Sort the fields  

    for (j=1;j<=NR;j++) {                           # For every line in the file
        for(i=1;i<=x;i++) {                         # For the top x values
            if (lines[j] == field_a[sort[i]]) {     # If current line in top x
                sub(/On/,"Off",lines[j])            # Do the subsitution
                break                               # Grab the next line
            }
        }
        print lines[j]                              # print the line
    }
}

Save it to file such as script.awk and run like:

$ awk -f script.awk file
4.96035894  2.94014535  9.71651378 On
8.37470259  9.08139103 10.23145322 Off
5.73085411  4.21656546  9.98718707 On
6.40892867  9.44195654  8.83707549 Off
4.26065784  3.74966832  7.89520829 Off
8.89601431  9.84208918  9.63054539 On
9.10538764  8.58408119 10.87454882 On
6.21494725  4.61164407  9.08378204 Off
7.62256424  9.59449339 10.84506558 Off
6.49210768  4.03768151 10.75221925 Off
5.04079861  4.99362253 10.34349177 Off

By default it turns off the lowest 3 values in field 3 but you can specify both the field and the number of values using the -v option. For instances lets turn off the lowest 10 values in field 3 leaving just the maximum value turned on:

$ awk -v x=10 -f script.awk file
4.96035894  2.94014535  9.71651378 Off
8.37470259  9.08139103 10.23145322 Off
5.73085411  4.21656546  9.98718707 Off
6.40892867  9.44195654  8.83707549 Off
4.26065784  3.74966832  7.89520829 Off
8.89601431  9.84208918  9.63054539 Off
9.10538764  8.58408119 10.87454882 On
6.21494725  4.61164407  9.08378204 Off
7.62256424  9.59449339 10.84506558 Off
6.49210768  4.03768151 10.75221925 Off
5.04079861  4.99362253 10.34349177 Off

How about the just maximum from field 2:

$ awk -v x=10 -v field=2 -f script.awk file
4.96035894  2.94014535  9.71651378 Off
8.37470259  9.08139103 10.23145322 Off
5.73085411  4.21656546  9.98718707 Off
6.40892867  9.44195654  8.83707549 Off
4.26065784  3.74966832  7.89520829 Off
8.89601431  9.84208918  9.63054539 On
9.10538764  8.58408119 10.87454882 Off
6.21494725  4.61164407  9.08378204 Off
7.62256424  9.59449339 10.84506558 Off
6.49210768  4.03768151 10.75221925 Off
5.04079861  4.99362253 10.34349177 Off

Note: the use of the asort() function requires GNU awk.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1, very nice as always! –  Fredrik Pihl May 4 '13 at 13:07
    
Any reason for the unaccept? –  iiSeymour May 16 '13 at 10:18
    
Sorry it was a mistake :) –  B3y0nd3r May 16 '13 at 11:16

Something like this would work:

x=3
f=3
awk -v f="$f" '{print $f, NR, $0}' file |
sort -n |
awk -v x="$x" 'NR<=x{sub(/On/,"Off")} {print}' |
sort -k2n |
awk '{sub(/[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +/,""); print}'

f is the field you want to sort on, x is how many min values you want flagged.

You could do it all in awk using insertion sort or gawks builtin sorting functions asort()/asorti() but the above is simple and I'm lazy...

$ x=3; f=3; awk -v f="$f" '{print $f, NR, $0}' file | sort -n | awk -v x="$x" 'NR<=x{sub(/On/,"Off")} {print}' | sort -k2n | awk '{sub(/[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +/,""); print}'
4.96035894  2.94014535  9.71651378 On
8.37470259  9.08139103 10.23145322 Off
5.73085411  4.21656546  9.98718707 On
6.40892867  9.44195654  8.83707549 Off
4.26065784  3.74966832  7.89520829 Off
8.89601431  9.84208918  9.63054539 On
9.10538764  8.58408119 10.87454882 On
6.21494725  4.61164407  9.08378204 Off
7.62256424  9.59449339 10.84506558 Off
6.49210768  4.03768151 10.75221925 Off
5.04079861  4.99362253 10.34349177 Off

$ x=4; f=2; awk -v f="$f" '{print $f, NR, $0}' file | sort -n | awk -v x="$x" 'NR<=x{sub(/On/,"Off")} {print}' | sort -k2n | awk '{sub(/[^ ]+ +[^ ]+ +/,""); print}'
4.96035894  2.94014535  9.71651378 Off
8.37470259  9.08139103 10.23145322 Off
5.73085411  4.21656546  9.98718707 Off
6.40892867  9.44195654  8.83707549 On
4.26065784  3.74966832  7.89520829 Off
8.89601431  9.84208918  9.63054539 On
9.10538764  8.58408119 10.87454882 On
6.21494725  4.61164407  9.08378204 Off
7.62256424  9.59449339 10.84506558 Off
6.49210768  4.03768151 10.75221925 Off
5.04079861  4.99362253 10.34349177 Off
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, very nice as always! –  Fredrik Pihl May 4 '13 at 13:06
    
You might want to throw a column -t on the end to sort the formatting but note the 3rd column will be left aligned not right aligned like in the original file. –  iiSeymour May 4 '13 at 13:11
1  
I would also change $6 to $NF so the solution works for files with more than 4 fields. –  iiSeymour May 4 '13 at 13:17
    
@sudo_O - good points, I've updated my answer to address both. –  Ed Morton May 4 '13 at 13:25

and another approach:

n=4
field=3
newval=FOO
# find the line numbers that need to be updated
set -- $(
    cat -n file |
    sort -nk $((++field)),$field |
    awk -v n=$n 'FNR <= n {print $1}'
)
# now, update the value for the specific lines
awk -v val="$newval" -v lines=" $* " 'lines ~ " "FNR" " {$NF = val} 1' file
share|improve this answer

Yet another approach, reading the file twice, ordering as we go..

awk '
  NR==FNR{
    S[0]=$field
    # sort the value into place
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
      if(S[i-1]>S[i]){
        c=S[i-1]
        S[i-1]=S[i]
        S[i]=c
      }
    }
    # shift the highest value into oblivion
    if(NR>n) for(i=n; i>=1; i--) S[i]=S[i-1]
    next
  }
  # Create associative array entries for the values 
  FNR==1 {
    for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
      A[S[i]]
    }
  }
  # if $field is one of the values then change the last field (assuming there are no other fields with value of $NF)
  $field in A {
    sub($NF,"Off")
  }
  1
' n=3 field=3 file file
share|improve this answer

Just find the value that splits the file:

a=($(sort -n -k $sortf $valuesfile | sed -n "${linex}p"))
splitval="${a[2]}"

and then use awk to present the correct values:

awk -v splitval="${splitval}" -v chanv=${chanv} \
    '{ if ($3<=splitval) {$4=chanv}} 1 ' $valuesfile

A full script may be:

#!/bin/bash
valuesfile=${1:-values.txt} # file to process.

Usage(){ echo "Usage: `basename $0` $valuesfile [valuechange]"; exit 1; }
[ $1 ] || Usage

# Define some vars
chanv=${2:-On}  # value to change the field to.
[ $2 ] || "using $chanv as default value"
linex=3     # Number [1..] of "lines with lowest value" to change.
sortf=3     # field [1...] to sort from lowest to highest.
chanf=4     # field [1...] to change

# Find value that splits the values file:
a=($(sort -n -k $sortf $valuesfile | sed -n "${linex}p"))

# Needed vars for awk
b=$((sortf-1))
splitval="${a[$b]}"

# Process file.
awk -v splitval="${splitval}" -v chanv="${chanv}" \
    -v sortf="${sortf}"       -v chanf="${chanf}" \
    '{ if ($sortf<=splitval) {$chanf=chanv}} 1 ' $valuesfile
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.