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Suppose I have a class like this:

class Node {
public:
    Node(Node* parent = 0) : mParent(parent) {}
    virtual ~Node() {
        for(auto p : mChildren) delete p;
    }

    // Takes ownership
    void addChild(Node* n);

    // Returns object with ownership
    Node* firstChild() const;

    // Does not take ownership
    void setParent(Node* n) { mParent = n; }

    // Returns parent, does not transfer ownership
    Node* parent() const { return mParent; }

private:
list<Node*> mChildren;
Node* mParent;
};

I'd now like to use smart pointers and/or rvalue references to indicate where ownership is and isn't transferred.

My first guess would be to change mChildren to contain unique_ptrs, adapting the function signatures as follows.

    // Takes ownership
    void addChild(unique_ptr<Node> n);

    // Returns object with ownership
    unique_ptr<Node>& firstChild() const;

    // Does not take ownership
    void setParent(Node* n) { mParent = n; }

    // Returns parent, does not transfer ownership
    Node* parent() const { return mParent; }

Now, this would be kind of problematic when I need to pass the result of Node::firstChild() to some function that observes it, but does not take ownership, as I'd need to explicitly call .get() on the unique_ptr, which as I understand it, is not recommended.

What is the correct and recommended way to indicate ownership using unique_ptr without having to resort to using .get() and passing around bare pointers?

share|improve this question
    
Why not passing it to the function as a reference to const unique_ptr ? That way, the function can peek at it, and no copy is made. –  JBL May 4 '13 at 10:23
    
@JBL because e.g. parent() returns a non-unique pointer, meaning I'd have to overload each function for raw and unique pointers. –  SeySayux May 4 '13 at 10:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

At first, I would use std::vector rather than std::list to contain the children. Unless you have a strong motivation for not using it, std::vector should be the default container. If you are worried about performance, don't be, because contiguous allocation done by std::vector is likely to cause higher cache hit rate, thus speeding up access enormously with respect to std::list, which implies a scattered allocation/access pattern.

Secondly, you are correct in having a std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Node>> for holding children, since it is reasonable to assume a node to hold ownership of its child nodes. All other pointers except the one accepted by addChild(), on the other hand, should be non-owning raw pointers.

This applies to the mParent pointer and to pointers returned by Node's member functions. In fact the, firstChild() member function could even return a reference, throwing an exception if the node has no children. This way you will create no confusion whatsoever about who is owning the returned object.

Returning a unique_ptr, or a reference to a unique_ptr, is not the correct idiom: unique pointers represent ownership, and you do not want to give ownership to clients of Node.

This is how your class could look like:

#include <vector>
#include <memory>
#include <stdexcept>

class Node {
public:
    Node() : mParent(nullptr) { }

    void addChild(std::unique_ptr<Node>&& ptr) {
        mChildren.push_back(std::move(ptr));
        ptr->setParent(this);
    }

    Node& firstChild() const {
        if (mChildren.size() == 0) { throw std::logic_error("No children"); }
        else return *(mChildren[0].get());
    }

    Node& parent() const {
        if (mParent == nullptr) { throw std::logic_error("No parent"); }
        else return *mParent;
    }

private:

    void setParent(Node* n) { 
        mParent = n; 
    }

    std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Node>> mChildren;
    Node* mParent;
};

You could of course decide to return non-owning, potentially null raw pointers instead of references if you want to avoid throwing exceptions. Or you could add a pair of hasParent() and getNumOfChildren() methods to retrieve information about a Node's state. That would allow clients to perform the check if they do not want to handle exceptions.

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I might have to make a lot of middle insertions/removals which is why I initially chose std::list over std::vector. –  SeySayux May 4 '13 at 10:34
    
@SeySayux: std::vector may still be superior because of a higher cache hit rate (although complexity is worse, in practice memory access pattern dominates). Try doing some measurements before you commit to std::list. –  Andy Prowl May 4 '13 at 10:35
    
Is it necessary / advantageous to take a unique_ptr by rvalue-ref instead of by value? –  dyp May 4 '13 at 10:38
    
@DyP: It is a matter of style. It is not necessary in this case, because clients will have to do std::move() anyway, but in general it may be needed to express the fact that you want clients to provide an rvalue (and if they want to pass an lvalue, they have to std::move() it). So I am doing it even here, although for non-copyable classes like std::unique_ptr it is not strictly necessary, since clients can only provide rvalues. –  Andy Prowl May 4 '13 at 10:40
    
@SeySayux will you be inserting and removing from the middle an order of magnitude more often than you will be iterating over the container? I doubt it. c.erase( std::remove_if( c.begin(), c.end(), [&]()->bool{ code } ), c.end() ); gives you O(n) iterate-and-remove-elements, and similar tricks can be used to insert batches into the middle of your container. –  Yakk May 4 '13 at 17:54

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