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A file 'Definitions.py' contains the code:

def testing(a,b):
    global result
    for count in range(a,b):
        result.append(0)
    print result

While file 'Program.py' contains the code:

from Definitions import *
result = []
testing(0,10)
print result

The result of the Definitions.py is the expected list of zeros, while the variable within Program.py is just the empty list despite results being defined as a global variable. How can this be made to run the function from Definitions.py but pass the resulting variable to be used within Program.py?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Global namespaces are relative to a module. They are not shared between modules.

You could return the result:

def testing(a,b):
    result = []
    for count in range(a,b):
        result.append(0)
    return result

and use it like this:

result = testing(0,10)
print result

But note that above, a new list, result = [], is being created in testing each time it is called.

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That's a good point, but what if the 'testing' function where to create two variables? Say result1 and result 2. How would I get result 1 and result2 both into Program.py? Setting result1 = testing(0,10) would not work then as it will be returning result1 and result 2. –  Dan Reardon May 4 '13 at 10:28
    
You could return a tuple of objects: return result1, result2. And you could unpack them on the other side with result1, result2 = testing(0, 10). –  unutbu May 4 '13 at 10:28
    
Oh yes, and then I would set result1 = testing(0,10)(0)?? Or something to grab the first element? –  Dan Reardon May 4 '13 at 10:30
    
@DanReardon you can grab both : result1,result2=testing(0,10), or to grab only one result1=testing(0,10)[0]. –  undefined is not a function May 4 '13 at 10:31
    
Brilliant, that makes a lot of sense. Thank you. –  Dan Reardon May 4 '13 at 10:33
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The global scope only applies to the module (file) that it's in.

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Oh well that's a bit of a waste then.. Thanks! –  Dan Reardon May 4 '13 at 10:31
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The global for testing is the global namespace of the Definitions.py , i.e the location where def testing(a,b) was defined. So, it can't see/access the result in Program.py.

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