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Suppose I have a C++ class and I would like to have a recursive member-function which is called with instances items of the class, for example

// the eplicit "this" is just for clarity in the following code:
void recursivePrintTree(){
    (if this == NULL){ // We are "out" of the tree
        return; 
    }
    cout << this->val;
    (this->leftSon)->printBinaryTree();
    (this->rightSon)->printBinaryTree();
}

The problem is of course invoking undefined behaviour by calling printBinary with NULL in the first place! so I would like to avoid this, and as far as I know I have at least three ways of doing so:

1) Using static member functions, which get an explicit this-type argument that can be safely checked. this is actually what I did so far but because it's a very recursive implementation, almost all of the member-functions get coded as static. That's not very good, right?

2) checking the stop condition for the next node before having another recursive call with a NULL pointer possibly as "this". This is a much less natural form of writing and actually checks other items other that This. and I would like to avoid it.

3) Using default dummy values. Tried it, felt it's not really saving me any special-case-treatment, but that may have been just because of the Generic-ness of my tree.

I have really been fussing around this matter for a while now so would appreciate any good advice.

share|improve this question
1  
this can not be NULL, because at least you have an object which is calling that method. – deepmax May 4 '13 at 11:26
1  
... what syntax is this? – Rhymoid May 4 '13 at 11:30
    
Write if (!this) instead. It's more idiomatic. – jrok May 4 '13 at 11:31
1  
@jrok First, this can never be null, which is the crux of his question. And second, the only acceptable way of checking for a null pointer is to compare it with NULL or 0 (or nullptr, in C++11). Implicit conversions are confusing, and should generally be avoided. – James Kanze May 4 '13 at 11:43
1  
@Jiwan: Take a step back. The root problem is that he is walking a tree, not a node. And the tree walking code doesn't belong in Node, but in Tree (which, of course, knows something about Node, since it has Nodes). – James Kanze May 4 '13 at 11:44

Let's try out your implementation:

#include <iostream>

class BinaryTree {
    public:
        BinaryTree(int value, BinaryTree * left, BinaryTree * right) : value_(value), left_(left), right_(right) {}

        void printBinaryTree(int depth = 0) {

            for ( int i = 0; i < depth; i++ ) std::cout << "  ";

            if ( this == NULL ) {
                std::cout << "Null node, returning..." << std::endl;
                return;
            }
            else {
                std::cout << value_ << std::endl;
            }

            left_->printBinaryTree(depth+1);
            right_->printBinaryTree(depth+1);
        }

    private:
        int value_;
        BinaryTree * left_;
        BinaryTree * right_;
};

int main() {
    BinaryTree leaf(0,NULL,NULL);
    BinaryTree top(1,&leaf, &leaf);

    top.printBinaryTree();

    return 0;
}

If we make this run, we get an output that looks like this:

1
  0
    Null node, returning...
    Null node, returning...
  0
    Null node, returning...
    Null node, returning...

The reason why this works is explained here: Accessing class members on a NULL pointer

However, as per C++ standard, doing this is undefined behaviour. As in, this works only because the implementation of your, or in this case mine, compiler is able to make this work. It is not a guarantee of any kind, and this reduces your portability, and could even stop working if you ever need to update your compiler!

There are a bunch of alternatives to this. You already list some, though I must say I dislike the static implementation because it doesn't make really sense from a design standpoint, and makes all your code a mess. An additional solution could be to make the printBinaryTree function virtual, and define the leaf nodes as a child class of the tree. This is an example:

#include <iostream>

class BinaryTree {
    public:
        BinaryTree(int value, BinaryTree * left, BinaryTree * right) : value_(value), left_(left), right_(right) {}

        virtual void printBinaryTree(int depth = 0) {

            for ( int i = 0; i < depth; i++ ) std::cout << "  ";

            std::cout << value_ << std::endl;

            left_->printBinaryTree(depth+1);
            right_->printBinaryTree(depth+1);
        }

        int getValue() { return value_; }

    private:
        int value_;
        BinaryTree * left_;
        BinaryTree * right_;
};

class BinaryTreeLeaf : public BinaryTree {
    public:
        BinaryTreeLeaf(int value) : BinaryTree(value, NULL, NULL) {}

        virtual void printBinaryTree(int depth=0) {
            for ( int i = 0; i < depth; i++ ) std::cout << "  ";

            std::cout << getValue() << std::endl;
        }

};

int main() {
    BinaryTreeLeaf leaf(0);
    BinaryTree top(1,&leaf, &leaf);

    top.printBinaryTree();

    return 0;
}

The output here, as desired, is:

1
  0
  0
share|improve this answer

The second solution is the only solution if you want to navigate from within the node structure. The usual solution, however, is to distinguish between nodes and the tree, and the navigation code is a member of the tree object, not the node. At most, the node has a function to return the next pointer. This means that the naviagtion functions would take a pointer to the nodes; your printBinaryTree might be something like:

void
BinaryTree::print( Node const* node )
{
    if ( node != NULL ) {
        node->print();
        print( node->next() );
    }
}

Or you can use the visitor pattern, which separates the tree walking code from the actions at each node.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that the visitor pattern seam legit for this case. – Jiwan May 4 '13 at 11:50

Your code is wrong.

Instead of checking for NULL in this, you can check for NULL in this->next so you can avoid calling the method for NULL pointers in the first place.

That is, instead of:

void printBinaryTree() {
    if(this == NULL){
       return;
    }
    cout << this->val;
    this->next->printBinaryTree();
}

Do this:

void printBinaryTree() {
    cout << this->val;
    if(this->next)
        this->next->printBinaryTree();
}

BTW. this is a linked list.

share|improve this answer
    
I think he knows that. That's why he's asking the question: he wants to know the best way of avoiding the null this pointer. – James Kanze May 4 '13 at 11:41
    
Thanks. The solution you kindly suggested is what I mentioned in option 2, but then I have to check for NULL outside the function before calling it the first time. Imagine having a pointer to a tree which very possibly be empty. than that pointer is not a node but a null, and I would need to check for it every first invoking of printTree(). I would like to avoid this. – Elad Shtiegmann May 4 '13 at 11:41

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