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Below is a code I written to find the smallest element of an unsorted array in C++.

How should I go about editing my recursive function to find the second or even the third smallest element in the array?

I understand there are other methods out there (I've searched), however I'd like to know how to do it using a recursive function like this which works for just the minimum number.

int min(vector<int> &array, int &min, int &next_min, int left,int right)
{    
    int a;        
    int b;

    if(left == right) { 
        return array[left];
    } else {   
        int mid= (right+left)/2;

        a = min(array,left,mid);
        b = min(array,mid+1,right);

        if (a<b) 
            return b;
        else         
            return a;
    }
}

Many thanks in advance

Here is my attempt at finding the 2nd smallest:

#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;

int counter=0;

void minf(vector<int> &array,int left,int right,int &min, int &next_min);

int main()
{
    int next_min;

    cout << "Enter integers one line at a time. (Enter -999 to terminate)" << endl;

    vector<int> array;  // 
    int input;

    while(true){
        cin >> input;
        if(input == -999) //check for termination condition
        break;
        array.push_back(input);
    }

    int imin;
    int imax;

    cout<<"Enter imin, then imax"<<endl;
    cin>>imin;
    cin>>imax; 

    cout<<"Min number is " << next_min <<endl;

    cin.get();
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

void minf(vector<int> &array,int left,int right,int &min, int &next_min)
{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
    int d;

    if(left == right) { 
        min = array[left];
        next_min = 2147483647;
    } else {
        int mid= (right+left)/2;

        minf(array,left,mid,a,b);
        minf(array,mid+1,right,c,d);

        if (a < b && a < c && a < d) {
            min = a;
            if (b<c && b <d)
                next_min = b;
            else if (c < b && c < d)
                next_min = c;
            else
                next_min = d;
        }    

        if (b < a && b < c && b < d){
            min = b;
            if (a<c && a <d)
                next_min = a;
            else if (c < b && c < d)
                next_min = c;
            else
                next_min = d;
        }

        if (c < a && c < b && c < d) {
            min = c;
            if (b<a && b<d)
                next_min = b;
            else if (a < b && a < d)
                next_min = a;
            else
                next_min = d;
        }   

        if (d < a && d < c && d < b){
            min = d;
            if (a<c && a <b)
                next_min = a;
            else if (c < b && c < a)
                next_min = c;
            else
                next_min = b;
        }     
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Instead of making your function return the smallest element, you'll need to make it return the top n-smallest elements. –  Vaughn Cato May 4 '13 at 16:04
    
Hiya, I'm not really sure what you mean. Could you explain a little more? Thanks –  Candy Man May 4 '13 at 16:12
    
This problem does not lend itself well to a recursive solution, especially since the iterative one is already optimal at O(n). This recursive requirement is not practical. Closing as off topic, since SO is for practical programming problems, not theoretical ones. –  Raymond Chen May 4 '13 at 16:16
    
Right now, min returns a single int with the smallest value. To generalize your algorithm, you'll need to have it return a vector of ints with the top n smallest values. Most of the rest of the logic will be the same. –  Vaughn Cato May 4 '13 at 16:16
    
@VaughnCato I see. Thanks I'll try it out! –  Candy Man May 4 '13 at 16:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is a function which will find the n smallest elements in a recursive way, hope it helps!

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

vector<int> nMin(const vector<int> &array, int n, int left, int right) {
    vector<int> result;
    if (left == right) {
        result.push_back(array[left]);
    } else {
        int mid = (right + left) / 2;
        vector<int> leftResult = nMin(array, n, left, mid);
        vector<int> rightResult = nMin(array, n, mid + 1, right);
        int i = 0;
        int l = 0;
        int r = 0;
        int L = leftResult.size();
        int R = rightResult.size();
        while (i < n && (l < L || r < R)) {
            i++;
            if (l < L) {
                if (r < R) {
                    if (leftResult[l] < rightResult[r]) {
                        result.push_back(leftResult[l++]);
                    } else {
                        result.push_back(rightResult[r++]);
                    }
                } else {
                    result.push_back(leftResult[l++]);
                }
            } else {
                result.push_back(rightResult[r++]);
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}

int main() {
    vector<int> test = {-2, 6, 7, 1, 3, 7, 4, 2, 5, 0, 8, -2};
    vector<int> smallest3 = nMin(test, 3, 0, test.size() - 1);
    for (int num : smallest3) {
        cout << num << endl;
    }
}

Brief explanation: Get up to n smallest elements in ascending order from the left & right half, call them leftResult and rightResult, then merge the two, always picking the next smallest element from the two partial results. This is like merge sort, except that it will only return up to n elements instead of sorting the whole array.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. I just realized something though, if there are two numbers that are similar in an array, e.g. {1 , 1 , 3 , 4} , searching for the 2nd minimum will also give 1 instead of 3. –  Candy Man May 5 '13 at 5:03

Is there any reason you can not use std::sort(vector.beigin(), vector.end())? Then vector[0] is smallest, vector[1] is second smallest, and so on....

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, there isnt any reason why I cannot. However I'm sitting for an examination in a couple of days time, and I think there was a huge hint that we might be tested on writing a recursive function to find the second minimum element strictly on an unsorted array. Hence I'm trying to figure this out beforehand –  Candy Man May 4 '13 at 16:05
    
IMHO, this is not a best problem statement for understanding/using recursive functions. Try solving Tower of Hanoii problem using recursion and non-recursion :) –  Bill May 4 '13 at 16:08

Even though you divide the array in two halves in each step, you searching is still linear (since your data is unsorted). What about giving the function the last minimum?

int minf(vector<int> &array, int last_min)
{
    int minimum = 2147483647;
    for (vector<int>::iterator it = array.begin(); it != array.end(); ++it)
        if(*it < minimum && *it > last_min) minimum = *it;
    return minimum;
}

Then you can write a function that prints n smallest elements:

void printMins(vector<int> &array, int count)
{
    int last_min = -2147483648;
    while(count-- > 0)
    {
        last_min = minf(array, last_min);
        cout << last_min << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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