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Working in C# and Java, I've seen basically one way everybody initializes singletons:

static obj _inst = null;

obj getInstance() {
  if (_inst == null) {
    _inst = new obj();
  }
  return _inst;
}

Now, when I move to Objective-C for the iPhone, whenever I see code samples, I see basically the same thing:

static obj _inst = nil;

+ (obj *) sharedObj {
  if (!_inst) {
    _inst = [[obj alloc] init];
  }
  return _inst;
}

There's a class method +initialize that's called on every class in the Objective-C runtime before it's used. Is there any reason I couldn't use that to create my singletons?

static obj _inst = nil;

+ (void) initialize {
  if (self == [obj class]) {
    _inst = [[obj alloc] init];
  }
}

+ (obj *) sharedObj {
  return _inst;
}

It works just fine when I try it in my code, and it gets rid of checking to see if it exists every time before it's accessed. Is there any reason I shouldn't create singletons this way?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As far as I'm concerned +initialize is the way to do it. Peter Hosey suggests a couple of other catches (inside -init and -allocWithZone:) to make sure you can't instantiate more than one instance of the class, ever. Thus making it a true singleton class and not just a class with a pointer to a particular instance of itself within it.

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Initializing the singleton in +initialize will always allocate the instance. If the instance requires significant resources (including initializarion time which will extend the time before your app becomes responsive at statup) and might not be used, lazy initializarion, as in your examples makes sense.

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except +initialize is called only the first time the class is accessed anyway. –  Ed Marty Oct 28 '09 at 18:55
    
Good point. I stand corrected. –  Barry Wark Oct 28 '09 at 19:09
2  
Just to point out that there is a case (and it's really an edge case here) that +initialize can be called more than once. Take the example of Class A and Class B being a subclass of Class A. Class A implements +initialize, but Class B doesn't. When +initialize is sent to Class B, because it doesn't implement its own, its superclass (Class A)'s implementation of +initialize is used. And so Class A's +intialize has been called more than once. At any rate, your check in +initialize is enough to stop this affecting you. Just putting it out there for knowledge and completeness. :) –  Daniel Tull Oct 28 '09 at 23:57
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Lazy Initialization all the way!

I prefer this pattern (similar to what you have):

+ (id) sharedInstance {
     static MyObject *sMyObject = nil;
     if (!sMyObject) {
         sMyObject = [[MyObject alloc] init];
     }
     return sMyObject;
}

- (oneway void) release { 
     // no-op
}

There is no need to put this in +(void)initialize for a singleton, since it will only get called when you first attempt to use the class.

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I would prefer to put it in the initialize method, because then I don't have to check if (!sMyObject) every time the sharedInstance is accessed. –  Ed Marty Oct 28 '09 at 20:15
    
The (!isMyObject) is such a lightweight operation, literally a cmp/jmp instruction on the CPU. I agree you shouldn't be calling [MyObject sharedInstance] every time either. MyObject *obj = [MyObject sharedInstance]; [obj blah]; [obj setColor: [NSColor greenColor]]; [obj setName: @"Hola"]; –  jarjar Nov 6 '09 at 18:06
1  
In a multithreaded environment this can lead to multiple objects being allocated & initialized, yet only one sticks. Either the + (void) initialize should be used, or a @synchronized needs to protect this. A little clever method swizzling can help speed up future sharedInstance calls to avoid the synchronization & check. –  Aaron Zinman Jun 5 '13 at 19:35
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