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In the Wikipedia article on decltype http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decltype I came across this example:

int& foo(int& i);
float foo(float& f);

template <class T> auto transparent_forwarder(T& t) −> decltype(foo(t)) {
  return foo(t);
}

Though I understood the motive behind this function, I didnot understand the syntax it uses and specifically the -> in the declaration. What is -> and how is it interpreted?

EDIT 1

Based on the above: What is wrong here?

template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto sum(T1 v1, T2 v2) -> decltype(v1 + v2) {
    return v1 + v2;
}

The error is:

error: expected type-specifier before ‘decltype’
error: expected initializer before ‘decltype

Answer to EDIT 1:

OOPS! I forgot to use -std=c++11 compiler option in g++.

EDIT 2

Based on the below answer. I have a related question: Look at the declaration below:

template <typename T1, typename T2>
decltype(*(T1 *) nullptr + *(T2 *) nullptr) sum2(T1 v1, T2 v2);

It is using decltype without the need for -> in the function declaration. So Why do we need ->

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by stijn, Drew Dormann, Angew, MSalters, Graviton May 9 '13 at 4:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html#suffix-return –  user1508519 May 4 '13 at 17:00
    
To all those who voted for a close of this question. This question is different from linked question after my edits. Have a look again. –  footy May 4 '13 at 17:22
    
@footy: If you have a new question, ask a new question. SO is a Q&A site, not a threaded discussion site. –  MSalters May 6 '13 at 9:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This uses trailing return type notation. This:

auto f() -> T { ... }

Is equivalent to this:

T f() { ... }

The advantage is that with a trailing return type notation you can express the type of a function based on expressions that involve the arguments, which is not possible with the classical notation. For instance, this would be illegal:

    template <class T>
    decltype(foo(t)) transparent_forwarder(T& t) {
//  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
//  Error! "t" is not in scope here...

        return foo(t);
    }

Concerning your edit:

Based on the above: What is wrong here?

template <typename T1, typename T2>
auto sum(T1 v1, T2 v2) -> decltype(v1 + v2) {
    return v1 + v2;
}

Nothing.

Concerning your second edit:

[...] It is using decltype without the need for -> in the function declaration. So Why do we need ->

In this case you don't need it. However, the notation that does use trailing return type is much clearer, so one may prefer it to make the code easier to understand.

share|improve this answer
    
I added the actual error message. –  footy May 4 '13 at 17:07
    
@footy: What is your compiler? –  Andy Prowl May 4 '13 at 17:09
    
.. Ahh I see now.. I forgot to use the -std=c++11 option in g++ –  footy May 4 '13 at 17:10
1  
@footy: Thought so ;) Well, now you can play with it a bit –  Andy Prowl May 4 '13 at 17:12
    
See my edit 2. :P –  footy May 4 '13 at 17:21

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