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Over a year ago, I asked the question How to use a proxy in Haskell, and since then I have a small amount of use of the RankNTypes GHC extension. The trouble is every time I try to work with it, I end up with bizarre error messages and hacking around the code until they go away. Or else I give up.

Obviously I don't really understand higher rank polymorphism in Haskell. To try to resolve that, I decided to get right down to the simplest examples I could, test all my assumptions and see if I could get myself a Eureka moment.

First assumption - the reason higher rank polymorphism isn't a standard Haskell 98 (or 2010?) feature is that, provided you accept some not-that-obvious restrictions that a lot of programmers wouldn't even notice, it isn't needed. I can define rank 1 and rank 2 polymorphic functions that are, at first sight, equivalent. If I load them into GHCi and call them with the same parameters, they'll give the same results.

So - simple example functions...

{-# LANGUAGE RankNTypes #-}

rank0 :: [Int] -> Bool
rank0 x = null x

rank1a :: [a] -> Bool
rank1a x = null x

rank1b :: forall a. [a] -> Bool
rank1b x = null x

rank2 :: (forall a. [a]) -> Bool
rank2 x = null x

and a GHCi session...

GHCi, version 7.4.2: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/  :? for help
Loading package ghc-prim ... linking ... done.
Loading package integer-gmp ... linking ... done.
Loading package base ... linking ... done.
Prelude> :load example01
[1 of 1] Compiling Main             ( example01.hs, interpreted )
Ok, modules loaded: Main.
*Main>

No errors so far - good start. Next, test each function with an empty list parameter...

*Main> rank0 []
True
*Main> rank1a []
True
*Main> rank1b []
True
*Main> rank2 []
True
*Main>

To be honest, I was a little surprised the rank1a and rank1b functions worked in this case. The list doesn't know what type elements it contains, the functions don't know either, yet surely the type must be decided to make that call? I was expecting to need to provide an explicit signature somewhere.

That's not really the issue ATM though, and the results seem promising. Next up, non-empty lists...

*Main> rank0 [1,2,3]
False
*Main> rank1a [1,2,3]
False
*Main> rank1b [1,2,3]
False
*Main> rank2 [1,2,3]

<interactive>:10:8:
    No instance for (Num a)
      arising from the literal `1'
    In the expression: 1
    In the first argument of `rank2', namely `[1, 2, 3]'
    In the expression: rank2 [1, 2, 3]
*Main>

Oh dear - it seems like the rank 2 version doesn't like it when the parameter knows a bit more about it's type. Still, maybe the issue is just that the literals 1 etc are polymorphic...

*Main> rank2 ([1,2,3] :: [Int])

<interactive>:11:8:
    Couldn't match type `a' with `Int'
      `a' is a rigid type variable bound by
          a type expected by the context: [a] at <interactive>:11:1
    Expected type: [a]
      Actual type: [Int]
    In the first argument of `rank2', namely `([1, 2, 3] :: [Int])'
    In the expression: rank2 ([1, 2, 3] :: [Int])
*Main>

The error is different, but it still didn't work and I still don't understand these error messages.

Messing around with various theories, one idea I had was that maybe I need to tell GHC to "forget" some of the static type of the list. On that theory, I tried various things including...

*Main> [1,2,3] :: [a]

<interactive>:12:2:
    No instance for (Num a1)
      arising from the literal `1'
    In the expression: 1
    In the expression: [1, 2, 3] :: [a]
    In an equation for `it': it = [1, 2, 3] :: [a]
*Main>

OK, GHCi doesn't know what I'm talking about. In case GHCi just needed to know exactly which type to forget, I also tried...

*Main> ([1,2,3] :: [Int]) :: [a]

<interactive>:15:2:
    Couldn't match type `a1' with `Int'
      `a1' is a rigid type variable bound by
           an expression type signature: [a1] at <interactive>:15:1
    Expected type: [a]
      Actual type: [Int]
    In the expression: ([1, 2, 3] :: [Int]) :: [a]
    In an equation for `it': it = ([1, 2, 3] :: [Int]) :: [a]
*Main>

So much for my hopes of getting an error to the effect that GHCi doesn't know how to show a value with a forgotten type. I don't know how to construct a list with a "forgotten" static type and I'm not even sure that makes sense.

At this point I'm not trying to do anything useful with higher rank polymorphism. The point here is simply to be able to call the rank2 function with a non-empty list, and to understand why it's not working exactly the same as the other functions. I want to carry on figuring this out step by step myself, but right now I'm just completely stuck.

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1  
“To be honest, I was a little surprised the rank1a and rank1b functions worked in this case.” GHCi applies more extensive type defaulting than GHC: it's giving the list the type [()]. You'd get a type error normally when compiling. –  dave4420 May 4 '13 at 20:35
2  
@dave4420: I don't think you would. Defaulting only applies when the type is constrained somehow, but here it is forall a. [a] (and the result is Bool, so that doesn't require defaulting either). –  Vitus May 4 '13 at 23:35
    
@Vitus No, ghci has more defaulting rules than that. dave4420 is exactly right. It's defaulting the type to, depending on the version of GHC, either () or Any. This is just something ghci does to try to let you run expressions without providing type signatures. –  Carl May 5 '13 at 3:13
2  
@Carl: Yes, I'm aware that GHCi has more defaulting rules, but none of these apply here. The report states that only ambiguous type variables are defaulted. By that definition, forall a. [a] is prefectly fine type that doesn't need defaulting, GHCi then relaxes type classes that can participate in defaulting and also allows types to be defaulted to (). And indeed, GHCi is quite cool about forall a. [a]. Any is an implementation detail. –  Vitus May 5 '13 at 11:43
2  
Yes, @Vitus is correct here. Fully polymorphic types don't need defaulting because it doesn't matter what they are. The Any type is primarily a placeholder GHC uses internally to instantiate irrelevant types to something concrete while compiling. Defaulting is only necessary for type variables with a type class constraint, because the choice of instance does matter. –  C. A. McCann May 6 '13 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Let's think about what the type of rank2 means.

rank2 :: (forall a. [a]) -> Bool
rank2 x = null x

The first argument to rank2 needs to be something of type forall a. [a]. The forall being outermost here means that whoever gets such a value can pick their choice of a. Think of it like taking a type as an extra argument.

So, in order to give something as an argument to rank2, it needs to be a list whose elements can be of any type that the internal implementation of rank2 might want. Since there's no way to conjure up values of such an arbitrary type, the only possible inputs are [] or lists containing undefined.

Contrast this with rank1b:

rank1b :: forall a. [a] -> Bool
rank1b x = null x

Here the forall is already outermost, so whoever uses rank1b itself gets to pick the type.

A variation that would work would be something like this:

rank2b :: (forall a. Num a => [a]) -> Bool
rank2b x = null x

Now you can pass it a list of numeric literals, which are polymorphic over all Num instances. Another alternative would be something like this:

rank2c :: (forall a. [a -> a]) -> Bool
rank2c x = null x

This works because you can indeed conjure up values of type forall a. a -> a, specifically the function id.

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So - to pass anything useful to that function, and to do anything useful with that parameter, I'm definitely going to need some kind of typeclass constraint - perhaps rank2 :: (forall a. Num a => [a]) -> Bool? –  Steve314 May 4 '13 at 17:26
    
@Steve314 Pretty much - with (forall a.[a])-> Bool, you can't really do anything with the elements. You can check things about the length, but that's about it. –  AndrewC May 4 '13 at 17:29
    
OK - I'm a little surprised because the null function obviously doesn't care about the types of the elements in the list. However, while I got the idea that the polymorphic parameter has a set of possible types, and forgot it was the callee that decides which type to interpret it as (though now you mention it, I think that was mentioned in an answer to my previous question). –  Steve314 May 4 '13 at 17:37
1  
@Steve314 Yes, null doesn't care about the types of the elements. That's why the general rank1x works. For rank2, you specified a far more restrictive type, but you failed to provide an argument that could have the restrictive type forall a. [a]. Once you specify a type that's less general than the inferred type, you restricted the possible use cases of your function. –  Daniel Fischer May 4 '13 at 17:41
1  
Extra thanks for the rank2c example. I'll just throw in a rank2d :: (forall a . [a] -> [a]) -> Bool to show that I think I'm starting to get that Eureka - the callee can often usefully decide the type of a parameter when that parameter is a function - a suitable parameter is simply an ordinary (rank 1) polymorphic function which might e.g. rearrange values within a structure without caring what type of values it's rearranging. –  Steve314 May 4 '13 at 18:19

Let's compare those explicit forall type signatures :

rank1b :: forall a. [a] -> Bool
rank1b x = null x

This means forall a.([a]->Bool), so works, as you expect on all lists, no matter what type, and returns a Bool.

rank2 can only accept polymorphic lists:

rank2 :: (forall a. [a]) -> Bool
rank2 x = null x

Now this is different - this means that the argument x must itself be polymorphic. [] is polymorphic because it can be any type:

>:t [] 
[] :: [a]

which secretly means forall a.[a], but rank2 won't accept ['2'] because that has type [Char].

rank2 will only accept lists that are genuinely of type forall a.[a].

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At this point I'm not trying to do anything useful with higher rank polymorphism. The point here is simply to be able to call the rank2 function with a non-empty list, and to understand why it's not working exactly the same as the other functions. I want to carry on figuring this out step by step myself, but right now I'm just completely stuck.

I am not so sure higher rank polymorphism is what you think it is. I think the concept makes only sense with regard to function types.

For example:

reverse :: forall a. [a] -> [a]
tail    :: forall a. [a] -> [a]

tells us, that reverse and tail work irrespective of the type of the list element. Now, given this function:

foo f = (f [1,2], f [True, False])

What is the type of foo? Standard HM inference can't find the type. Specifically, it cannot infer the type of f. We must help the type checker here and promise that we pass only functions that don't care about the list elements' type:

foo :: (forall a. [a] -> [a]) -> ([Int], [Bool])

Now we can

foo reverse
foo tail

and thus have a usable rank-2 type. Note that the type signature forbids to pass something like:

foo (map (1+))

because the passed function is not totally independent of the element type: it requires Num elements.

share|improve this answer
    
I commented before - deleted them because they suggested a new misunderstanding that I'd rather not infect others with. Still, agreed, I had misunderstood rank 2 polymorphism and that was helped along by a misunderstanding of rank 1 polymorphism resulting in part from a false analogy with C++ templates. Basically, a C++ template function specifies a whole bunch of monomorphic functions - you have to know which one to call it. I now understand that in Haskell a polymorphic function is just one function - the actual type has to be fixed somehow, but you don't have to select a particular... –  Steve314 May 4 '13 at 20:41
    
monomorphic implementation to call it. –  Steve314 May 4 '13 at 20:46
    
Also, if you want to use higher-rank polymorphism with data (as opposed to functions), sooner or later you're going to also need ImpredicativePolymorphism, which is a whole different ball of wax. In large part because ghc doesn't entirely support it at this time. –  John L May 5 '13 at 4:20

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