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I'm learning how to use pickle. I've created a namedtuple object, appended it to a list, and tried to pickle that list. However, I get the following error:

pickle.PicklingError: Can't pickle <class '__main__.P'>: it's not found as __main__.P

I found that if I ran the code without wrapping it inside a function, it works perfectly. Is there an extra step required to pickle an object when wrapped inside a function?

Here is my code:

from collections import namedtuple
import pickle

def pickle_test():
    P = namedtuple("P", "one two three four")
    my_list = []
    abe = P("abraham", "lincoln", "vampire", "hunter")
    my_list.append(abe)
    f = open('abe.pickle', 'w')
    pickle.dump(abe, f)
    f.close()

pickle_test()
share|improve this question
    
Unfortunately, pickle doesn't seem to work well with namedtuples. –  Antimony May 4 '13 at 17:48
1  
@Antimony: pickle handles namedtuple classes just fine; classes defined in a function local namespace not so much. –  Martijn Pieters May 4 '13 at 23:37
    
possible duplicate of Python: Can't pickle type X, attribute lookup failed –  AirThomas Jun 17 at 2:23
    
@AirThomas This question was asked/answered a year ago :) –  Dirty Penguin Jun 17 at 20:01
    
That doesn't affect whether it's a duplicate - and now the questions are linked to each other in the sidebar, which is useful. The comment is not meant as a criticism, it's automatically generated when flagging. –  AirThomas Jun 17 at 20:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Create the named tuple outside of the function:

from collections import namedtuple
import pickle

P = namedtuple("P", "one two three four")

def pickle_test():
    my_list = []
    abe = P("abraham", "lincoln", "vampire", "hunter")
    my_list.append(abe)
    f = open('abe.pickle', 'w')
    pickle.dump(abe, f)
    f.close()

pickle_test()

Now pickle can find it; it is a module global now. When unpickling, all the pickle module has to do is locate __main__.P again. In your version, P is a local, to the pickle_test() function, and that is not introspectable or importable.

It is important to remember that namedtuple() is a class factory; you give it parameters and it returns a class object for you to create instances from. pickle only stores the data contained in the instances, plus a string reference to the original class to reconstruct the instances again.

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Excellent! Thank you. –  Dirty Penguin May 4 '13 at 18:03
2  
So, what if I am creating the namedtuple dynamically because I don't know the fields until runtime? Is there still a way to bypass this issue? I tried creating another method outside of the class but that didn't work. –  Chuim Jun 26 '13 at 19:53
2  
@Chuim: Assign it to your module globals (use globals() to get a mapping) under the same name, and pickle can find it still. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 26 '13 at 21:12

After I added my question as a comment to the main answer I found a way to solve the problem of making a dynamically created namedtuple pickle-able. This is required in my case because I'm discovering the fields during runtime (after a DB query).

All I do is monkey patch the namedtuple by effectively moving it to the __main__ module:

def _CreateNamedOnMain(*args):
    import __main__
    namedtupleClass = collections.namedtuple(*args)
    setattr(__main__, namedtupleClass.__name__, namedtupleClass)
    namedtupleClass.__module__ = "__main__"
    return namedtupleClass

By mindful that the namedtuple name (which is provided by args) might overwrite another member in __main__ if you're not careful.

share|improve this answer
4  
Simply set it on globals() instead: globals()[namedtupleClass.__name__] = namedtupleClass. Then there is no need to set the __module__. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 26 '13 at 21:13

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