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I added this recursive BubbleSort algorithm to my game which runs on lwjgl. I'm trying to sort an ArrayList of "Cloud" objects by a float which is the speed of this cloud.

For some reason sometimes I get a "java.lang.StackOverflowError" at the line I invoke the method in itself.

Here's the code:

public void sort() {
    for (int i = 0; i < clouds.size() - 1; i++) {
        Cloud cl1 = clouds.get(i);
        Cloud cl2 = clouds.get(i + 1);
        if (cl1.getSpeed() < cl2.getSpeed()) {
            continue;
        }
        clouds.set(i, cl2);
        clouds.set(i+1, cl1);
        this.sort();
    }
}

And here are the errors I'm getting:

Sat May 04 20:28:45 CEST 2013 ERROR:null
java.lang.StackOverflowError
         at backgrounds.Clouds.sort(Clouds.java:224)
[...] // The line above is repeated for some hundred times.
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I recommend implementing comparable in your Cloud class, you are using a collection to hold the clouds it seems (.size) so Collections.sort() would take care of it for you. Inventing own methods are fun though ;) –  arynaq May 4 '13 at 18:55
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5 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

That happens when two consecutive clouds have the same speed.

cl1.getSpeed() < cl2.getSpeed()

is false, so the clouds get swapped and sort is called again. In that call,

cl1.getSpeed() < cl2.getSpeed()

is still false, so you swap again and call sort. This goes on forever (or better: till the stack is full).

Change < to <= and everything should work fine.

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Thanks it's working now! –  Deconimus May 4 '13 at 18:56
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You comparison logic should skip two cloud objects if they are same too -

Change if to -

if (cl1.getSpeed() <= cl2.getSpeed()) {
    continue;
}
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Both other answers are correct, however if you use the built in sort method it is a better practice for avoid errors and the algorithm used is likely quicksort or mergesort which is faster than bubble sort –  aaronman May 4 '13 at 18:56
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It might be better to use the built in sort method for arrays in java Arrays.sort() to use this all you have to do is override the compare to method. Here is how it looks.

@Override
public int compareTo(Book other) {
//compare logic here
}

You must also implement Comparable to do this

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It can be further optimized as

public void sort() {
    boolean swaps = false;
    for (int i = 0; i < clouds.size() - 1; i++) {
        Cloud cl1 = clouds.get(i);
        Cloud cl2 = clouds.get(i + 1);
        if (cl1.getSpeed() <= cl2.getSpeed()) {
            continue;
        }
        swaps = true;
        clouds.set(i, cl2);
        clouds.set(i+1, cl1);
    }

    //Re-Iterate all the elements only if a swap is found
    if( swaps )
      this.sort();
}
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I think that's happening anyway. But thanks for the answere. –  Deconimus May 4 '13 at 19:05
    
doing so would be faster, also I really don't think you need do a recursive call for this! Anyways nice to know your problem was solved –  Akash May 4 '13 at 19:23
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Common cause for a stack overflow is a bad recursive call which is caused when your recursive functions doesn't have the correct termination condition, so it ends up calling itself for ever. In your case the termination condition is not satisfied due to the strictly '<' sign so you have to changes this to "<=" that's it.

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