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Help me write the most succinct method that takes one argument (a single-level hash) and returns a copy with the values set to nil.

example input hash

{
  email: 'hans@moleman.com',
  first_name: 'Hans',
  last_name: 'Moleman'
}

returned value

{
  email: nil,
  first_name: nil,
  last_name: nil
}
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2  
The goal seem contradictory: clear the values of a hash in a non-mutating way? Maybe you mean return a new hash having the same keys as the original, with values all nil? –  FMc May 4 '13 at 20:00
1  
The question is heavily misleading. The expression "becomes" implies that the original is changed. But the previous comments revealed that that is not what the OP wants. –  sawa May 4 '13 at 20:18
1  
@sawa, I agree. Patrick, I'd recommend removing term "non-mutating" from the question title and instead changing it to explain more directly what you want, to avoid confusion. If we're interpreting you correctly, a better title might be "How to create a new hash containing the same keys as another but with nil values?". It's a bit clunky, but it's more clear about intention. –  Ben Lee May 4 '13 at 20:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What about this?

new_hash = Hash[original_hash.keys.zip([])]

Take the keys of the hash, zip with an empty array to get pairs of keys with nil, and use Hash[] to convert it back to a hash.

Or, as @mu_is_too_short pointed out in the comments, another way to do this that might be less tricky to read is:

new_hash = Hash[original_hash.keys.map { |k| [k, nil] }]

This is a good alternative, credit to @mu.

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1  
Or equivalently Hash[h.keys.map { |k| [k, nil] }] depending on how much you like the .zip([]) trickery. –  mu is too short May 4 '13 at 20:17
    
@muistooshort, nice alternative. I added that to my answer (with credit to you) –  Ben Lee May 4 '13 at 20:21
    
@muistooshort How is my one? :) –  Arup Rakshit May 4 '13 at 20:42
    
I think this is a really elegant solution, I'll give it a few days and if I don't see any challengers I'll give you the checkmark. –  Patrick Klingemann May 5 '13 at 4:32
h= {
  email: 'hans@moleman.com',
  first_name: 'Hans',
  last_name: 'Moleman'
}
Hash[*h.flat_map{|k,_| [k,nil]}]
#=> {:email=>nil, :first_name=>nil, :last_name=>nil}

or simply

Hash[h.map { |k,_| [k,nil] }]
#=> {:email=>nil, :first_name=>nil, :last_name=>nil}
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Nice one! I've never seen flat_map before. Love that there's always a dozen ways to do anything in ruby. –  Ben Lee May 4 '13 at 20:49
3  
Hash::[] likes arrays of pairs just fine, so no need for splat or flat_map, just map and be done with it. –  dbenhur May 4 '13 at 22:01
3  
@dbenhur is right. This works just fine: Hash[h.map { |k,_| [k,nil] }] –  Ben Lee May 5 '13 at 0:13
    
@BenLee good re-think! :) –  Arup Rakshit May 5 '13 at 2:42

The answer to the question before it was supplemented with its comments

h = {
  email: 'hans@moleman.com',
  first_name: 'Hans',
  last_name: 'Moleman'
}
h.keys.each{|k| h[k] = nil}

But don't forget that there is a more straightforward way to clear a hash:

h.clear
h # => {}

The answer to the question supplemented with its comments

original = {
  email: 'hans@moleman.com',
  first_name: 'Hans',
  last_name: 'Moleman'
}
h = {}
original.keys.each{|k| h[k] = nil}
h # The hash you want
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@FMc Thanks for letting me know. Updated the answer. –  sawa May 4 '13 at 20:09

The best solution I could come up with:

def clear_values(single_level_hash)
  single_level_hash
    .keys
    .reduce({}) do |hash, key|
      hash[key] = nil
      hash
    end
end

There must be a better way!

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