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I have a Java application that uses a native library for some of its functionality. It uses JNI to control the native library and also receives asynchronous callback from the library. You can think of it as a Java frontend and native backend that communicate with each other.

I am facing a memory leak. Shortly after I start the application, the memory slowly but steadily increases. So I tried to look what could cause the leak.

First, I tried replacing the Java frontend with a simple C++ text interface. That way, the application doesn't use Java in any way - and the leaks stopped. So the problem must be in Java frontend.

So I fired up the jvisualVM to see if the heap increases - and it turned out it doesn't. The Java heap size was fairly constant. I even launched the program with xmx32m, but the memory kept increasing well past 100m without any OutOfMemoryErrors. In fact, the jvisualVM showed Java heap at about 7m.

So I dug deeper into the program with WinDbg. I analyzed the heap patterns with !heap -s command and I got this:

Heaps on a freshly run program:

0:059> !heap -s
LFH Key                   : 0x382288b9
Termination on corruption : ENABLED
  Heap     Flags   Reserv  Commit  Virt   Free  List   UCR  Virt  Lock  Fast 
                    (k)     (k)    (k)     (k) length      blocks cont. heap 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
00330000 00000002    2048   1704   2048     22    71     2    0      0   LFH
005b0000 00001002    1088    212   1088     68     3     2    0      0   LFH
00aa0000 00001002    1088    108   1088     15     7     2    0      0   LFH
004f0000 00001002   15424  12876  15424   1372    89     9    0      1   LFH
...

0:059> !heap -stat -h 004f0000
 heap @ 004f0000
group-by: TOTSIZE max-display: 20
    size     #blocks     total     ( %) (percent of total busy bytes)
    2b110 20 - 562200  (60.36)
    98 166e - d5150  (9.33)
    6cd20 1 - 6cd20  (4.77)
    ...

Heaps on a program that has been running for about half an hour:

0:046> !heap -s
LFH Key                   : 0x5e47ba72
Termination on corruption : ENABLED
  Heap     Flags   Reserv  Commit  Virt   Free  List   UCR  Virt  Lock  Fast 
                    (k)     (k)    (k)     (k) length      blocks cont. heap 
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
006b0000 00000002    2048   1744   2048     46    92     2    0      0   LFH
00200000 00001002    1088    220   1088     68     3     2    0      0   LFH
00950000 00001002    1088    108   1088     15     7     2    0      0   LFH
001b0000 00001002   47808  31936  47808   1855   102    12    0      0   LFH
...

0:046> !heap -stat -h 001b0000
 heap @ 001b0000
group-by: TOTSIZE max-display: 20
    size     #blocks     total     ( %) (percent of total busy bytes)
    98 59d1 - 355418  (36.67)
    2b110 10 - 2b1100  (29.61)
    6cd20 1 - 6cd20  (4.68)
    ...

Now it can be clearly seen that the leaks are caused by a growing number of blocks with size 98. But when I try to analyze one of the blocks with !heap -p -a, I get:

*** ERROR: Symbol file could not be found. Defaulted to export symbols for jvm.dll

without any stack trace. So the blocks are allocated somewhere inside the jvm.dll, and because there are no pdbs for JVM, I cannot debug the leak further.

I managed to pinpoint where the leak is occuring in my code. All callbacs to the Java frontend pass through one function:

void callback(JNIEnv *env, int stream, double value, char *callbackName){
    jclass jni = env->FindClass("nativ/Callbacks");
    jmethodID callbackMethodID = env->GetStaticMethodID(jni, callbackName, "(ID)V");
    jvalue params[2];
    params[0].i = (long)(stream);
    params[1].d = value;
    env->CallStaticVoidMethodA(jni, callbackMethodID, params); //commenting this out stops the leaks
}

When I comment out the last command, the leaks stop, but I get no feedback back to the frontend.

Could this be a JVM bug? How do I find out?

share|improve this question
    
Windows heaps are an old API. Most malloc() implementations do not use them. –  brian beuning May 4 '13 at 21:04
    
@brian Could you please elaborate on that? What other APIs are then used? And how does that explain the increase I see in the Windbg output? –  Jakub Zaverka May 4 '13 at 21:13
1  
All the malloc() I have looked at use VirtualAlloc(). If the heap growth matches the process size growth, then is is some API using the windows heaps. –  brian beuning May 4 '13 at 21:56

1 Answer 1

malloc() internally calls HeapAlloc(). I guess you need a 'Release' method to release the memory allocated by JVM, as long as your library hold reference to JVM's internal state.

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