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Looking to search through all files in a directory, looking at every line and if the line starts with a word such as "This", then search that line to find and replace a targeted word. I did get a solution for it being a one line command, but looking to have it as a perl file or a .txt file using bash if possible.

Example:

This rabbit jumped high

The rabbit jumped high

(find and replace high to low if the line starts with "This:

This rabbit jumped low

The rabbit jumped high
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This seems trivial, please show what you've tried. It's just an if and s///. –  Barmar May 4 '13 at 22:35
1  
You already asked the question here: “If a sentence starts with a specific word, how to change a word in that sentence if it does exist?”. Putting the command into a script is kind of trivial –  amon May 4 '13 at 22:41
    
@Barmar, I haven't tried anything, I don't know how to do it if it's on a script, I have only seen a solution on how to do it at the command line which is here: stackoverflow.com/questions/16371999/… –  Exeter May 5 '13 at 0:24
    
@amon, yes, that is what I mentioned in the original question. –  Exeter May 5 '13 at 0:24
    
Do you know how to write an if statement in perl? Do you know how to do a substitution in perl? Do you know how to loop over input in perl? Put them together and you have the solution. –  Barmar May 5 '13 at 0:30

3 Answers 3

sed '/^This/{s/high/low/g}' file

will do it for you:

kent$  echo "This rabbit jumped high

The rabbit jumped high"|sed '/^This/{s/high/low/g}'
This rabbit jumped low

The rabbit jumped high

If you want to replace word "high" instead of text high:

sed '/^This/{s/\<high\>/low/g}' file

for example:

kent$  echo "This rabbit jumped high with highfoo      

The rabbit jumped high"|sed '/^This/{s/\<high\>/low/g}' 
This rabbit jumped low with highfoo

The rabbit jumped high
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Well done. Can you explain the {s/high/low/g} syntax? –  fedorqui May 4 '13 at 22:44
1  
@fedorqui substitute all high with low. –  Kent May 4 '13 at 22:46
    
Yes, I know the s/high/low/g syntax. The one I wasn't familiar to is the /^This/{}, I suppose it is a conditional in which case the {} is executed. –  fedorqui May 4 '13 at 22:51
    
@fedorqui yes you are right. and the {} in this answer could be omitted. because if matched /^This/ there is only one command s. {} would be useful if there are multi-commands need to be done when the line in a condition. similar as if(foo){ } –  Kent May 4 '13 at 22:57
    
That's pretty cool, good to know. Thanks for the explanation, it is clear to me now :) –  fedorqui May 4 '13 at 23:10

You can put your one line command in a bash script.

What was the one line command, what was wrong with it, and what is your difficulty with translating it? It's kind of rude to have a solution and not share it with us while asking for us to duplicate the solution in a different way.

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Sorry, here is the answer for that. One poster said it couldn't be done in a script so I didn't include it. stackoverflow.com/questions/16371999/… –  Exeter May 5 '13 at 0:29

It would be very complicated to do this in bash, but the power of shells reside in their ability to call other programs (such as Perl) to do the heavy lifting.

If there can only be at most one targeted word per line:

perl -pe's/^This\b.*\K\bhigh\b/low/'

Otherwise,

perl -pe's/\bhigh\b/low/ if /^This\b/'

Notes:

  • Only what's after the \K is replaced. ("K" for "keep").
  • \b helps make sure "This" and "high" is not part of another word (like "thight").

Usage:

perl -pe'...'            # From STDIN to STDOUT
perl -pe'...' file       # From file(s) to STDOUT
perl -i~ -pe'...' file   # Edit file(s) "in-place" (with backup).
perl -i -pe'...' file    # Edit file(s) "in-place" (without backup).
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