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Is there a better way to allocate the contents of this array, such as automatically calling the NewThing() constructor instead of manually constructing each element?

package main

import "sync"

type Thing struct {
    lock *sync.RWMutex
    data chan int
}

func NewThing() *Thing {
    return &Thing{ lock: new(sync.RWMutex), data: make(chan int) }
}

func main() {
    n := 10
    things := make([]*Thing, n)
    for i := 10; i < n; i++ {
        things[i] = NewThing()
    }
}

I realize i'm allocating an array of pointers, my other attempts were unsuccessful and data was not an initialized channel. This is just a contrived example.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
No, the constructor won't be called automatically for you. Just move your code into another function that accepts a quantity. Unfortunately there's no automatic initializer syntax for structs other than the default zero-value initialization. – squint May 4 '13 at 23:59
    
Thanks, I guess it kind of makes sense. Array initialization routines it is then – missionsix May 5 '13 at 0:11
    
A different take on it would be to have another type like type Things []*Thing, and give it its own constructor that initializes in a loop, and returns it. That'll let you do things := make(Things, n).Init() if you prefer. – squint May 5 '13 at 0:20
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can simply write:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sync"
)

type Thing struct {
    lock *sync.RWMutex
    data chan int
}

func NewThing() *Thing {
    return &Thing{lock: new(sync.RWMutex), data: make(chan int)}
}

func NewThings(n int) []*Thing {
    things := make([]*Thing, n)
    for i := range things {
        things[i] = NewThing()
    }
    return things
}

func main() {
    things := NewThings(3)

    fmt.Println("things: ", len(things))
    for _, thing := range things {
        fmt.Println(thing)
    }
}

Output:

things:  3
&{0xc200061020 0xc200062000}
&{0xc200061040 0xc200062060}
&{0xc200061060 0xc2000620c0}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks peterSO, this is exactly what squint had suggested. – missionsix May 5 '13 at 3:57

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