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I am working on a class for a MySQL database connection pool.

public class ConnectionPool
{
    private static ConnectionPool pool = null;
    private static DataSource dataSource = null;

    public synchronized static ConnectionPool getInstance()
    {
        if (pool == null)
        {
            pool = new ConnectionPool();
        }
        return pool;
    }

    private ConnectionPool()
    {
        try
        {
            InitialContext ic = new InitialContext();
            dataSource = (DataSource) ic.lookup("java:/comp/env/jdbc/music");
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public Connection getConnection()
    {
        try
        {
            return dataSource.getConnection();
        }
        catch (SQLException sqle)
        {
            sqle.printStackTrace();
            return null;
        }
    }

    public void freeConnection(Connection c)
    {
        try
        {
            c.close();
        }
        catch (SQLException sqle)
        {
            sqle.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

However it throws an exception here: {

  try
    {
        InitialContext ic = new InitialContext();
        dataSource = (DataSource) ic.lookup("java:/comp/env/jdbc/music");
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

However I have a mysql db called music and mysql should be correctly configured:

enter image description here

I am not sure why it throws a null pointer exception.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
The only possiblity i see for null pointer is that datasource is null. Where/How you are creating the datasource in your code? –  M Sach May 5 '13 at 3:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I wouldn't consider this to be a good implementation of a connection pool. Why? Looks like the pool is empty. It's probably not thread safe. No connection checking.

If you print or log the stack trace, it'll tell you exactly which line has the NPE. My guess is that the JNDI lookup fails, so the data source is null.

Why do you write a connection pool class? You're doing a JNDI lookup, which means you have a naming service running. Those are usually part of a Java EE app server, which probably has a connection pool built in. Why don't you just use that? If not, I'd use one that somebody else wrote. It's guaranteed to be better written than anything you'd write.

share|improve this answer

Use this line of code before accessing data source Context envContext = (Context)initContext.lookup("java:comp/env");

So the modified code would be

InitialContext ic = new InitialContext();
Context envContext = (Context)ic.lookup("java:comp/env");
dataSource = (DataSource) envContext.lookup("java:/comp/env/jdbc/music");

This solved my problem, might help you

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