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I have written a binary search algorithm, but it seems to be a bit different than other peoples that I've seen. I was hoping that the community could give me some feedback as to whether or not I'm missing something, or doing something the wrong way.

Binary Search:

import java.util.Arrays; 

public class BinarySearch {

    public int[] numbers = new int[] {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20}; 

    /**
     * @param num
     * @param key
     * 
     * Function recursively searches sorted array of integers, finding the specific number (key).
     * Search looks at the midpoint of array, checking to see if midpoint is number being sought,
     * if not, depending of whether the sought number is greater than, or less than, the midpoint
     * the function copies the upper, or lower, half of the array and passes it into a recursive 
     * function call.
     * 
     */
    public int performSearch(int[] num, int key){
        if(num.length == 0){
            System.out.println("Array empty"); 
            return 0; 
        }else{
            int mid; 
            int number=0; 
            mid = (num.length)/2; 
            if(key == num[mid]){
                number =  num[mid]; 
                System.out.println("Found the number " + number); 
                return number; 
            }else if((key < num[mid]) && num.length > 1){
                num = Arrays.copyOfRange(num, 0, mid); 
                System.out.println("Low Range: " + Arrays.toString(num)); 
                return performSearch(num, key); 
            }else if((key > num[mid]) && num.length > 1){
                num = Arrays.copyOfRange(num, mid, num.length); 
                System.out.println("High Range: " + Arrays.toString(num)); 
                return performSearch(num, key); 
            }else{
                System.out.println("Number does not exist in array."); 
                return 0; 
            }
            //return number; 
        }

    }

    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int key = 22; 
        BinarySearch bs = new BinarySearch(); 
        int index = bs.performSearch(bs.numbers, key); 
        System.out.println("Number " + index);
    }

}
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closed as off topic by Matt Ball, Cameron Skinner, BalusC, Fls'Zen, madth3 May 5 '13 at 2:17

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If you're returning, you don't need an else statement. –  Dhaivat Pandya May 5 '13 at 1:08
3  
Shouldn't this be on Code Review? –  Nicolás Carlo May 5 '13 at 1:08
    
What's code review? –  BlackHatSamurai May 5 '13 at 1:08
    
@Blaine www.codereview.stackexchange.com Its where you can get feedback on your code. –  Nicolás Carlo May 5 '13 at 1:09
1  
did you write some unit tests to verify your code? –  Bill May 5 '13 at 1:09

2 Answers 2

This implementation is very inefficient. The problem is this line:

num = Arrays.copyOfRange(num, 0, mid); 

It is creating a copy of the array, which takes a long time.

share|improve this answer
    
and there is no need to do so.. –  neham May 5 '13 at 1:11
    
What would you suggest instead? –  BlackHatSamurai May 5 '13 at 1:15
    
It would be much better to pass a reference to the original array, and the start and end of the range you want to work on as ints. You do not modify the array, so there is no need for a copy. –  Bailey S May 5 '13 at 1:15
    
Okay, thank you for your feedback. –  BlackHatSamurai May 5 '13 at 1:16

Here is program which avoids array copy.

import java.util.Arrays;

public class BinarySearch {

public int[] numbers = new int[] {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20}; 

public int performSearch(int[] num, int key, int startIdx, int endIdx ){
    if(num.length == 0){
        System.out.println("Array empty"); 
        return 0; 
    }else{
        int mid; 
        int number=0; 
        mid = (startIdx+endIdx)/2; 
        int currentLength = endIdx - startIdx;
        if(key == num[mid]){
            number =  num[mid]; 
            System.out.println("Found the number " + number); 
            return number; 
        }else if((key < num[mid]) && currentLength > 1){
            System.out.println("Low Range: " + Arrays.toString(num)); 
            return performSearch(num, key, startIdx, mid); 
        }else if((key > num[mid]) && currentLength > 1){ 
            System.out.println("High Range: " + Arrays.toString(num)); 
            return performSearch(num, key, mid,endIdx); 
        }else{
            System.out.println("Number does not exist in array."); 
            return 0; 
        }
        //return number; 
    }

}

/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    int key = 10; 
    BinarySearch bs = new BinarySearch(); 
    int index = bs.performSearch(bs.numbers, key,0,bs.numbers.length-1); 
    System.out.println("Number " + index);
}

}

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