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Assume this class code:

class Foo {
    function method() {
        echo 'works';
    }
}

Is there any way to store a reference to the method method of a Foo instance?

I'm just experimenting and fiddling around, my goal is checking whether PHP allows to call $FooInstance->method() without writing $FooInstance-> every time. I know I could write a function wrapper for this, but I'm more interested in getting a reference to the instance method.

For example, this pseudo-code would theoretically store $foo->method in the $method variable:

$foo = new Foo();
$method = $foo->method; //Undefined property: Foo::$method 
$method();

Apparently, as method is a method and I'm not calling it with () the interpreter thinks I'm looking for a property thus this doesn't work.

I've read through Returning References but the examples only show how to return references to variables, not methods.

Therefore, I've adapted my code to store an anonymous function in a variable and return it:

class Foo {
    function &method() {
        $fn = function() {
            echo 'works';
        };
        return $fn;
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$method = &$foo->method();
$method();

This works, but is rather ugly. Also, there's no neat way to call it a single time, as this seems to require storing the returned function in a variable prior to calling it: $foo->method()(); and ($foo->method())(); are syntax errors.

Also, I've tried returning the anonymous function directly without storing it in a variable, but then I get the following notice:

Notice: Only variable references should be returned by reference

Does this mean that returning/storing a reference to a class instance method is impossible/discouraged or am I overlooking something?


Update: I don't mind adding a getter if necessary, the goal is just getting a reference to the method. I've even tried:

class Foo {
    var $fn = function() {
        echo 'works';
    };
    function &method() {
        return $this->fn;
    }
}

But from the unexpected 'function' (T_FUNCTION) error I'd believe that PHP wisely doesn't allow properties to store functions.

I'm starting to believe that my goal isn't easily achievable without the use of ugly hacks as eval().

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is. You have to use an array, with two values: the class instance (or string of the class name if you are calling a static method) and the method name as a string. This is documented on the Callbacks Man page:

A method of an instantiated object is passed as an array containing an object at index 0 and the method name at index 1.

Demo (Codepad):

<?php
class Something {
    public function abc() {
        echo 'called';
    }
}

$some = new Something;

$meth = array($some, 'abc');

$meth(); // 'called'

Note this is also works with the built-ins that require callbacks (Codepad):

class Filter {
    public function doFilter($value) {
        return $value !== 3;
    }
}

$filter = new Filter;
$test = array(1,2,3,4,5);
var_dump(array_filter($test, array($filter, 'doFilter'))); // 'array(1,2,4,5)'

And for static methods -- note the 'Filter' instead of an instance of a class as the first element in the array (Codepad):

class Filter {
    public static function doFilter($value) {
        return $value !== 3;
    }
}

$test = array(1,2,3,4,5);

var_dump(array_filter($test, array('Filter', 'doFilter'))); // 'array(1,2,4,5)'
// -------- or -----------
var_dump(array_filter($test, 'Filter::doFilter')); // As of PHP 5.2.3
share|improve this answer
    
I've seen () on a string variable, but it is the first time I see an array being called. Thanks for the Man page link as well. =] –  Fabrício Matté May 5 '13 at 2:31
    
@FabrícioMatté I've updated to add a link to the docs page. Its with the callbacks. It's been a convention for a while, but I think it looks terribly ugly. –  PhpMyCoder May 5 '13 at 2:35
    
If you call that ugly, I hope you never have to read through my JavaScript snippets. ;) Thanks again for the quick answer. –  Fabrício Matté May 5 '13 at 2:37
    
Yow. The ordinary way to do this in most languages would be to use a closure to eta-convert (à la the almost-PHP $meth = function() { $some->abc() }) –  hobbs May 5 '13 at 2:47
    
@hobbs Agreed on the yow. Calling an array (technically a hash) seems illogical to me too. I just read in the docs that 5.2.3 lets you use the more docs-like syntax to refer to static methods call_user_func('Something::someStaticMethod'). If only this worked with instances (like call_user_func('$instance::someInstanceMethod')) but I guess that would conflict with static constants. –  PhpMyCoder May 5 '13 at 2:52

Yes, you can. PHP has a "callable" pseudo-type, which is, in fact, either just a string or an array. Several functions (usort comes to mind) accept a parameter of the "callback" type: in fact, they just want a function name, or an object-method pair.

That's right, strings are callable:

$fn = "strlen";
$fn("string"); // returns 6

As mentioned, it's possible to use an array as a callback, too. In that case, the first element has to be an object, and the second argument must be a method name:

$obj = new Foo();
$fn = array($obj, "method");
$fn(); // calls $obj->method()

Previously, you had to use call_user_func to call them, but syntax sugar in recent versions make it possible to perform the call straight on variables.

You can read more on the "callable" documentation page.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I was aware of strings holding function names, but it is the first time I see the array syntax. +1 for the detailed answer, I'd accept this but @PhpMyCoder answered first. –  Fabrício Matté May 5 '13 at 2:34

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