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I'm looking for a VCS that'll help me keep all of my work scripts in-sync.

Requirements:

  • Portable (as in flash drive, not code-level)
  • Run on Windows XP and Server 2003+
  • No installation dependencies (Cygwin, perl, Python)

I use Mercurial on my work machine for version control of the various T-SQL, ksh, perl, and CMD/BAT scripts that I maintain as a MS SQL Server DBA and Unix sysadmin. So far, hg has worked for my AIX boxes- I mount my home directory as I login, and deal with the repo as if it were local.

I haven't been able to find a similar solution for the Windows machines I use. Most of them I do not have Local Admin rights; even if I did, I'd rather not install (and maintain) Python + Mercurial on all of them. I can't get to my home directory on them remotely, which leaves a client running on each machine as the only option.

Bonus points for an answer that would let me use a single repo for both the Windows and Unix machines. :)

I'm running WinXP, with heavy use of Cygwin and a CrunchBang VM.

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From your question is not clear: do you want to find a way to run Mercurial on USB flah disk or you looking for any other solution? Bazaar has provided non-admin standalone installation as simple self-extracting archive. –  bialix Oct 29 '09 at 11:13
    
@bialix: You're right- my apologies. wojo read it correctly, so it worked out for me. The first sentence and the bullet points sum it up. I mentioned Mercurial because it's what I've been using. I wrote the question being open to the idea of a portable Mercurial (or Bazaar, git) for Windows. That said, fossil has turned out to be a perfect solution, beyond a portable version of something like Mercurial- single executable, very portable C code, no Python runtime, and a built-in web server. It's compiled out of the box on our older AIXes, NetBSD, OpenBSD, Linux, and Windows. Thanks! –  Aaron Nov 6 '09 at 16:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I use git myself, but am familiar with hg, bzr, etc. Fossil is the only one I've seen that is self-contained. It's used by the sqlite project, primarily.

See http://www.fossil-scm.org/

It should work across all the platforms you listed, as well!

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@wojo: Right on! I'm no expert on SCMs, but I have read a dozen pages when picking an SCM for a new project ~1 year ago- and I've never heard of this one. I've not gotten to playing with it yet, but I now have binaries running on each of the platforms I use- my XP laptop, my workstation Linux VM, one of my AIX boxes, and one of my Windows 2003/8 servers. Much to my surprise, it compiled out of the box w/ make on the AIX 4.3 machine but not on the Ubuntu 9.04-based distro that I use. First time for everything, I suppose! But this looks like the answer I was looking for- thanks! –  Aaron Oct 28 '09 at 20:41

If you like mercurial, it's easy to carry it around portably on a usb drive. There are several portable python packages out there. Instant django includes mercurial http://www.instantdjango.com/ and makes the rest of the python toolbox available to you as well.

I use it myself.

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1  
I ended up figuring out that you can do just that! You don't even need to use a Portable Python package. I managed to put together a portable Mercurial distro for my USB/SFX toolkit. No magic required- all I did was install Mercurial, copy out its folder, uninstall it, cut out some unneeded stuff and whamo it works. I've been using it on dozens of Windows machines for the last two months. Since posting, I've also not used AIX at all. Between that and the small annoyances I've had with fossil I've been using Hg entirely. –  Aaron May 25 '10 at 19:25
    
Great, thanks for the tip! :P –  Russell Oct 13 '11 at 3:05

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