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All conversions of the 160 bit SHA1 use 40 ascii characters (320 bits) to represent 160 bits of data (that I have been able to find). I have a need to optimize this and use as few ascii characters as possible to represent a SHA1 hash.

For instance this string "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" equals this in ASCII "2FD4E1C67A2D28FCED849EE1BB76E7391B93EB12" when converted by typical algorithms.

I have create an algorithm that uses 5 bits for each ASCII character so I go from needing 40 ASCII characters to 32 "F0K1032QD08C1M44U11B0R77P3R31L2I".

Does anybody have a better way to get fewer characters, but not lose information (by something like a lossy compression technique or using a smaller hash like MD5)? I have a need to potentially represent this hash as a folder on windows so using upper and lower case to use 6 bits per character cant be done.

class Program
{
    static byte[] GetBytesForTypical(byte[] hash)
    {
        List<byte> newHash = new List<byte>();

        foreach (byte b in hash)
        {
            int first4Bits = (b & 0xF0) >> 4;
            int last4bits = b & 0x0F;

            newHash.Add((byte)first4Bits);
            newHash.Add((byte)last4bits);
        }

        return newHash.ToArray();
    }

    public static string ConvertHashToFileSystemFriendlyStringTypical(byte[] str)
    {
        StringBuilder strToConvert = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (byte b in str)
        {
            strToConvert.Append(b.ToString("X"));
        }

        return strToConvert.ToString();
    }

    static byte[] GetBytesForCompressedAttempt(byte[] hash)
    {
        byte[] newHash = new byte[32];

        // the bit array 5 bits at a time
        // at 8 bits per bytes that is 40 bits per loop 4 times
        int byteCounter =0;
        int k = 0;
        for(int i=0; i < 4 ;++i)
        {
            //Get 5 bits worth
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x1F);
            hash[byteCounter] >>= 5;
            ++k;

            //Get 3 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x7);
            newHash[k] <<= 2;
            ++byteCounter;

            // get 2 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x3);
            ++k;

            // get 5 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x1F);
            hash[byteCounter] >>= 5;
            ++k;

            // get 1 bit
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x1);
            newHash[k] <<= 7;
            ++byteCounter;

            // get 4 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0xF);
            ++k;
            hash[byteCounter] >>= 4;

            // get 4 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0xF);
            ++byteCounter;

            // get 1 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x1);
            hash[byteCounter] >>=1;
            ++k;

            // get 5 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x1F);
            ++k;
            hash[byteCounter] >>= 5;

            // get 2 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x3);
            ++byteCounter;

            // get 3 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x7);
            ++k;

            // get 5 bits
            newHash[k] = (byte)(hash[byteCounter] & 0x1F);
            ++byteCounter;
            ++k;

        }

        return newHash;
    }

    public static string ConvertHashToFileSystemFriendlyStringCompressedl(byte[] str)
    {
        StringBuilder strToConvert = new StringBuilder();

        foreach (byte b in str)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(b < 32);

            if (b >= 10 && b < 32)
            {
                strToConvert.Append((char)(b - 10 + 'A'));
            }
            else
            {
                strToConvert.Append((char)(b + '0'));
            }
        }

        return strToConvert.ToString();
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        System.Security.Cryptography.SHA1 hasher = System.Security.Cryptography.SHA1.Create();

        byte[] data = hasher.ComputeHash(Encoding.Default.GetBytes("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"));
        byte[] stringBytesTypical = GetBytesForTypical(data);
        string typicalFriendlyHashString = ConvertHashToFileSystemFriendlyStringTypical(stringBytesTypical);
        //2FD4E1C67A2D28FCED849EE1BB76E7391B93EB12 == typicalFriendlyHashString

        byte[] stringBytesCompressedAttempt = GetBytesForCompressedAttempt(data);
        string compressedFriendlyHashString = ConvertHashToFileSystemFriendlyStringCompressedl(stringBytesCompressedAttempt);
        //F0K1032QD08C1M44U11B0R77P3R31L2I == compressedFriendlyHashString

    }
}

EDIT: The need to reduce to fewer than 40 characters has nothing to do with windows folder names. (although it could since windows paths have a limit). I need to conserve as much space as possible for human readable strings and then create a folder for anything that needs to be reviewed. The problem with the 40 character ascii string is that 1/2 of the bits are set to 0 and are in essence wasted. So when storing millions and millions of hashes space and lookup speed start to become intertwined. I cant redesign user workflow, but I can make the system more snappy and consume less memory

EDIT: Also this would improve user experience. Currently a user has to use a partial hash to look something up. Worse case (in practice) the first 8 characters in the hash need to be used currently to usually ensure there are no duplicates. These 8 characters represent 32 bits of real hash data. Going down to 5 bits per character users will only need 6 characters to ensure no dups. If I can get it to 6 bits then user should only need around 5 characters. This gets into the realm of what most people are able to memorize

EDIT: I've made some progress from the original code I posed above. Once I converted the hash into hexatridecimal (base 36) I was able to remove one of the characters from the original 5 bit implementation above. So I am currently at 31 characters. Which means that from the typical implementation where 8 characters are required for retrieval (in practice) users should be able to use 6 characters to retrieve the same data.

public static string ConvertHashToFileSystemFriendlyStringCompressed2(byte[] hashData)
        {
            string mapping = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789";

            BigInteger base10 = new BigInteger(hashData);
            string base36;
            var result = new Stack<char>();

            do
            {
                result.Push(mapping[(int)(base10 % 36)]);
                base10 /= 36;

            } while (base10 != 0);

            base36 = new string(result.ToArray());

            return base36;
        }

EDIT: Been doing more research and I have a graph that I wanted to post showing the diminishing returns you get as you increase the number of ASCII characters you have to choose from. You wind up needing more and more characters for smaller and smaller gains. I seem to be at the tail end of where you get the biggest bang for your buck (at 36 characters). So even if I am able to jump to use 64 characters (which I cant at the present time) I only remove 4 of the final string. However if slim down the original hash to 18 bytes those same 36 characters now only create a 27 character string (same length as converting to base 64). Now the problem is how can I reliably compress a 20 byte hash into 18 bytes. Truncation wont work since users will still have to memorize 6 characters if I use truncation. Since a SHA1 hash are random bytes I am not sure I can lossless compress 2 bytes away (10% space savings).

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EDIT: So my attempts to compress the hash bytes have not met with success. I expected this but had to try in order to prove this to myself. Basically what I did was attempt to use a Huffman Code to compress the original hash.

Since each value in the hash is equally likely (definition of a good hash) using a common Huffman tree for all compression is out of the question (since that would yield the same number of bits I am trying to compress for no net gain). However, once you create a Huffman tree for a specific hash you do get compression of the original hash (20 bytes to 16 bytes for example), only to have the saved 4 bytes subsequently lost because you have to store the Huffman tree as well. This approach may work for longer hash values (512 bits ect) but does not appear to work well enough for all SHA1 hash values to warrant implementation (only a very small subset of SHA1 hash outputs will benefit from this type of compression).

share|improve this question
    
Why are 40 chars needed to represent 160 bits? Because they represent the hex values. So two chars represent one byte (8 bits) because the "hex alphabet" ([0-9][A-F]) is used. Use a bigger alphabet and you'll need less characters. To represent one byte in one character, you'll need an alphabet of, oh, about 256 characters (coincidence?). Problem is, ASCII contains unprintable characters... but one way to improve your algorithm might be the use of lowercase characters and some punctuation maybe. –  Corak May 5 '13 at 5:33
    
" have a need to potentially represent this hash as a folder on windows so using upper and lower case to use 6 bits per character cant be done." I would love to get to 6 bits per character by using lowercase as well, but I cannot as the problem states. –  Matt Johnson May 5 '13 at 5:34
    
...on windows folder names are not case sensitive so a directory containing foo and FOO would not be allowed. –  Matt Johnson May 5 '13 at 5:45
    
Sorry, missed that. But the problem stayes the same. If you want the result to be shorter, you need a bigger alphabet. Another way without hashing would be some kind of a dictionary (in a database, xml or whatever) where you map a short foldername to the long value you want to hash. So the value "The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog" could for example be represented by the foldername "1". –  Corak May 5 '13 at 5:45
1  
Use an alphabet that consists of a-z, 0-9 and "+-[]()." nets a total of 43 different possible character (I might have missed some legal ones). According to wolfram-alpha, that should get you down to 30 characters. wolframalpha.com/input/… –  Alxandr May 5 '13 at 6:05

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