Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Certain HTML form elements have extra UI attached to them, like the up/down arrows on number. When printing the page however, those buttons are no longer needed, as the user can not interact with them in print form.

Text boxes are easy to deal with:

@media print {
    input {
        border: none;
        border-bottom: 2px solid #000000;
    }
}

Makes them print quite nicely, as a line with text on it. Just like a form one would fill out by hand. However doing the same for inputs like number leaves you with those nasty up/down arrows:

HTML <input type="number">

And then there are even less useful printouts, like range, which means nothing when on a page:

HTML <input type="range"

Is there any way to get around this? Any way to style that portion of the element to be invisible, but still see the value/text?

I realize one could swap out the type="" attribute with JS, or have another element holding the value to be displayed on print, but if there is a solution that can be done with CSS only, that would be superior.

share|improve this question
1  
That is not the problem, I don't want to hide the element, I want to hide the extraneous UI attached to certain kinds of input elements, that are meaningless when printed. Hiding the element its self would also hide its value/text, which is important. –  zeel May 5 '13 at 7:11
1  
No, it is the browser-given bits that make different types of input useful beyond what a simple text box can do. As I mentioned, the number type uses a pair of up/down buttons to increment/decrement the value. Those buttons however are not HTML buttons, they are provided by the browser for that specific kind of input. Thus hiding them is not strait forward. Hence the question. –  zeel May 5 '13 at 7:53
2  
you can try the webkit tricks, but be aware that if other browsers implement the HTML5 controls you will have to update your code stackoverflow.com/questions/3790935/… –  torm May 5 '13 at 8:08
2  
@torm Maybe the OP does actually want to use HTML5 input features in the browser. The problem comes when one prints the page and those form controls become useless. You're misunderstanding the question here –  Bojangles May 5 '13 at 8:08
2  
What is the use case here? If it's a printable report of the form submission, I wouldn't bother trying to deal with making the form elements print friendly, but rather give the user a results page that was print optimized. –  steveax May 6 '13 at 6:17

5 Answers 5

You can try to hide specific elements with CSS selectors

@media print {
    input[type=range] {
        display: none;
    }
}

However, to hide the arrows in a number element, perhaps you could try to put 2 elements instead, 1 text and 1 number, and then display the number when in screen mode, while the text is hidden, and vice-versa in print mode

@media print {
    input[type=text] {
        display: inline-block;
        border:none;
        border-bottom:2px solid #000;
        etc..
    }
    input[type=number] {
        display: none;
    }
}
@media screen {
    input[type=number] {
        display: inline-block;
    }
    input[type=text] {
        display: none;
    }
}

Something similar can be done for other form elements. It will depend on your implementation if you can use this method.

share|improve this answer
    
Like the other answer, that requires that the text box be updated with the value of the number constantly. As far as I know, this will always require JS. –  zeel May 6 '13 at 22:56

try to use a hidden test on screen and then show it on print

@media print {
    .hideOnprint {
        display: none;
    }
    .hideOnScreen {
        display: block;
    }
}
@media screen {
    .hideOnprint {
        display: block;
    }
    .hideOnScreen {
        display: none;
    }
}

affect the text with the class hideOnScreen and the input with the class hideOnPrint

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer the question I asked. –  zeel May 6 '13 at 10:39
    
I am looking for a solution that fixes the display behavior of the inputs, using CSS. Hidden text would require JavaScript, which is not what I am looking for. –  zeel May 6 '13 at 15:33
    
you dont need javascript to hide text, u can hide it with css by using display:none; i haven't any idea how to fix the display behaviour of the input with css. good luck –  wannas May 7 '13 at 7:44
    
The hidden text will not show the value of the input unless I update it with JS. –  zeel May 7 '13 at 19:26

Maybe you should use a simple javascript to get only the values of the concerned fields, on print action, change to a printable format, perform the print and change it right back to normal?

Really don't know if doable using only CSS.

You might want to consider using XML parsing mechanism. This is a really convenient method for such tasks.

http://webdesign.about.com/od/xslt/a/xslt-tutorial-1.htm

share|improve this answer
    
Ok ok corrected, noted, etc. –  trox May 6 '13 at 4:02
    
The problem is. . . Javascript. –  zeel May 6 '13 at 15:55

An alternative would be to provide a link to print, and have another copy of the page without all the extra stuff

ie:        www.something.com/page.htm
printpage  www.something.com/page-print.htm

this is the most common practice (also, you can reuse css with the print only parts in it)

hope that helps

share|improve this answer
    
Then I would need to submit the information to the server, and have it deal with it, and return the printer friendly page. This requires that a web-server is available. –  zeel May 6 '13 at 23:00
    
not nessesarily . you can add a button from here printfriendly.com/button –  Ess Kay May 7 '13 at 15:56
    
you can also use the same page but have two css pages --> read more here stackoverflow.com/questions/46718/… –  Ess Kay May 7 '13 at 15:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This effect can be achieved in webkit browsers. I still can not find a way to do it in others, but it will work for webkit.

@media print {
    input::-webkit-outer-spin-button,  
        input::-webkit-inner-spin-button {
        -webkit-appearance: none;
    }
}

Webkit actually treats those buttons as pseudo elements (with good reason) and provides a way to hide them. This is exactly the kind of behavior one would want, though being limited to just webkit is a bit annoying.

share|improve this answer
    
If anyone finds a way to do it in other browsers, please comment/edit. –  zeel May 11 '13 at 17:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.