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This is a question related to homework. It is not the homework itself, which I have completed.

Here's part of a function (the only pieces that I think relevant).

double mean(double* pD, int* sz) {
    double *meanPtr = new double;
    *meanPtr = 0.0;
    return *meanPtr; //how to deal with a memory leak in return statement? does it leak?
}

I'm concerned about the last bit. Does this result in a memory leak as I haven't pointed to null or deleted the pointer?

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3  
Yes. It is a memory leak since you never free the memory with delete. –  oseiskar May 5 '13 at 8:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you need to solve exactly this problem than do like this

double mean(double* pD, int* sz) {
    double mean = 0.0;
    return mean;
}

If this is just an example and you need to use pointers, then return a pointer. You can wrap it in std::shared_ptr to prevent manual memory control.

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Thank you. I'll look into std::shared_ptr. It is just an example where I needed to use pointers. –  Evan McNulty May 5 '13 at 18:16
    
"You can wrap it in std::shared_ptr to prevent manual memory control." - Typo, you meant std::unique_ptr. –  Christian Rau May 6 '13 at 11:02

Assuming that the pointer-part is fixed, you can do this.

double mean(double* pD, int* sz) {
    double *meanPtr = new double;
    *meanPtr = 0.0;
    // Code above is assumed to be a given.
    double result = *meanPtr;
    delete meanPtr
    return result;
}

Modern compilers spot that result is just the name of the return value, and generate efficient code for that.

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does it leak?

Of course it does leak like hell.

how to deal with a memory leak in return statement

I can't imagine a scenario when it would be valid to structure your code like this - simply don't do this. Why not just

return 0.0;

or

double foo = 0.0;
return foo;

?

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It's a good point. There's no good reason for it beyond the academic. I'll avoid structuring code like this. –  Evan McNulty May 5 '13 at 18:16

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