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The problem I am having is that when I write to a file the file output is different to the std.out because I am calling the sentence() twice. Once for the print and again for the write. How can I output the same to both?

I was thinking of writing to the file first and then opening it up to read but that seems clumsy.

Any ideas?

nouns = ["random_noun1","random_noun2","random_noun3"]
adverbs = ["random_adverb1","random_adverb2","random_adverb3"]
verbs = ["random_verb1","random_verb2","random_verb3"]

def random_n():
    random_noun = random.choice(nouns)
    return random_noun

def random_av():
    random_adverb = random.choice(adverbs)
    return random_adverb

def random_v():
    random_verb = random.choice(verbs)
    return random_verb

def sentence():
    s = str(random_n().capitalize()) + " " + str(random_av()) + " " + str(random_v()) + " " + str(random_n() + ".")
    return s

def WriteFile(filename,text):
    myfile = open(filename, 'a')
    print(text,file=myfile)
    myfile.close()


def generate():
    for generate in range(number_of_sentences()):
        print(generate +1, sentence())

Thanks

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closed as too localized by jamylak, plaes, Steven Penny, Peter Ritchie, Fls'Zen May 7 '13 at 3:47

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can simplify this code a lot;

import random

nouns = ["random_noun1","random_noun2","random_noun3"]
adverbs = ["random_adverb1","random_adverb2","random_adverb3"]
verbs = ["random_verb1","random_verb2","random_verb3"]

Your functions random_n(), random_av() and random_v() are the same except they use a different list of words. So according to the DRY principle (Don't Repeat Yourself), make it a single function that takes a parameter. There is no need to store the random choice, because the only thing you do with it is to return it. So the function becomes a one-liner.

def rnd(l):
    return random.choice(l)

Use str.join to join a string. :-) There is no need to convert the output of rnd() to a string, because it already is a string.

def sentence():
    return ' '.join([rnd(nouns).capitalize(), rnd(adverbs), rnd(verbs)+'.'])

Use a single function to print to stdout and write to a file. This code also gives an example how to use a docstring.

def generate(n, filename):
    """Write a number of random sentences to a file and standard output.

    Arguments:
    n -- the number of random sentences to write.
    filename -- the name of the file to write the sentences to.
    """
    with open(filename, 'w+') as outf:
        for generate in range(n):
            s = sentence()
            print(generate + 1, s)
            outf.write(s + '\n')
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Thanks that works well. I will look at changing the other sections too. It was clunky but it worked. This is much better. –  Vendril May 5 '13 at 11:18
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Just store the return value in a variable and use it for both printing and writing to a file:

def generate():
    with open(filename, 'a') as output_file:
        for generate in range(number_of_sentences()):  
            next_sentence = sentence() 
            print(generate +1, next_sentence)
            output_file.write(next_sentence) 
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sorry I have updated more of my main code. Thanks. –  Vendril May 5 '13 at 10:38
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def generate():
    with open(filename, 'a') as fh:
        for generate in range(number_of_sentences()):
            print(generate +1, sentence())
            fh.write(sentence()) 

Not sure about the variables but you get the idea.
Also not really sure how this print(generate +1, sentence()) works but you probably have a better idea of that since you wrote the code.

The with statement in python opens your file, places it in a placeholder (in this case fh) and when you leave that block, it automatically closes your handle.

It's also a bad idea to open-work-close a file within a loop, it will stress the hard-drive (and os) unnecessarily much.

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sorry I have updated more of my main code. Thanks. –  Vendril May 5 '13 at 10:38
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