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Good Day!

I need to solve synchronization problem using semaphores. I've read many tutorials and I now know that I should use a release method and am acquire method, however, i don't know where to use them in the code. could you please help me or link me to a useful tutorial. I have class Account:

public class Account {
   protected double balance;

  public synchronized void withdraw(double amount) {
    this.balance = this.balance - amount;
}

public synchronized void deposit(double amount) {
    this.balance = this.balance + amount;
}
  }

I have two threads: Depositer:

public class Depositer extends Thread {
    // deposits $10 a 10 million times
    protected Account account;

public Depositer(Account a) {
    account = a;
}

@Override
public void run() {
    for(int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
        account.deposit(10);
    }
}
}

And Withdrawer:

public class Withdrawer extends Thread {

    // withdraws $10 a 10 million times
    protected Account account;

public Withdrawer(Account a) {
    account = a;
}

@Override
public void run() {
    for(int i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
        account.withdraw(10);
    }
}
}

here is the main:

    public class AccountManager {
        public static void main(String[] args)  {           
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    Account [] account = new Account[2];
    Depositor [] deposit = new Depositor[2];
    Withdrawer [] withdraw = new Withdrawer[2];

    // The birth of  10 accounts
    account[0] = new Account(1234,"Mike",1000);
    account[1] = new Account(2345,"Adam",2000);

    // The birth of 10 depositors 
    deposit[0] = new Depositor(account[0]);
    deposit[1] = new Depositor(account[1]);


    // The birth of  10 withdraws 
    withdraw[0] = new Withdrawer(account[0]);
    withdraw[1] = new Withdrawer(account[1]);


            for(int i=0; i<2; i++)
            {
                deposit[i].start();
                withdraw[i].start();
            }               

    for(int i=0; i<2; i++){
        try {
            deposit[i].join();
            withdraw[i].join();
        } 
                    catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you explain how Semaphores are helpful for Accounts. They use usually implemented using locks as you have. BTW Normally money is transferred from somewhere to somewhere else. It is not created or destroyed as you do in your example. –  Peter Lawrey May 5 '13 at 12:08
    
@PeterLawrey You could deposit a check and withdraw it at an ATM ;-) –  assylias May 5 '13 at 12:09
    
I'd suggest to try and localize the problem first and post as short code as possible. –  Evgeniy Dorofeev May 5 '13 at 12:15
    
A semaphore is generally used for a situation where you want to limit a number of concurrent things to a fixed limit. Say you wanted to only allow at most 5 threads to be sending messages to a printing service, then a Semaphore with 5 available permits might be a good fit. As I believe you'd only want at most one thread to be modifying an account, I don't think a Semaphore would be a good fit. You could use a Lock object instead, but it seems you already synchronized your deposit and withdraw methods to protect concurrent access. Can you describe why you think a Semaphore fits this issue. –  cmbaxter May 5 '13 at 12:28
    
@cmbaxter Initially I was asked to use either a block synchronization or method synchronization which is what I have done. however, now I am asked to do the same thing using semaphores although I know it is not a good fit I must implement it :( –  Kopiko May 5 '13 at 12:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using a semapahore for your example could look like this:

import java.util.concurrent.Semaphore;

public class Account {
  private Semaphore semaphore = new Semaphore(1);
  private double balance = 0;

  public void withdraw(double amount){
    deposit(amount * -1);
  }

  public void deposit(double amount){
    semaphore.acquireUninterruptibly();
    balance += amount;
    semaphore.release();
  }  
}

This example is very similar semantically to the synchronized locking one as it sets up a single Semaphore per Account instance (similar to the single mutex available for locking on an object instance). It also waits uninterruptibly (i.e. forever) to acquire a permit, similar to the under the hood code that tries to acquire a lock on an object. If you didn't want to wait forever, you could change your impl to something like this:

import java.util.concurrent.Semaphore;
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

public class Account {
  private Semaphore semaphore = new Semaphore(1);
  private double balance = 0;

  public void withdraw(double amount){
    deposit(amount * -1);
  }

  public void deposit(double amount){
    try {
      semaphore.tryAcquire(1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
      balance += amount;
      semaphore.release();
    } 
    catch (InterruptedException e) {

      //Probably want to throw a more specific exception type here...
      throw new RuntimeException("Timed out waiting for an account balance...");
    }
  }  
}

In this example, you will only want up to 1 second to acquire a permit, and throw an exception if that does not happen.

share|improve this answer

I'm not sure if caught your problem properly, but I'll give it a shot.

Your Account class is already thread safe as you are using the 'synchronized' keyword for the withdraw and deposit methods. When a 'synchronized' method is called it locks on 'this', so any two 'synchronized' methods will never run at the same time for one instance of 'Account'. But if you want to be able to read the balance of one account you should add an accessor that also is synchronized. In that case the balance could only be read by one thread at a time, this could be changed by using a 'ReentrantReadWriteLock'. Here is a code on how you would use it:

class Account {
    private double balance;
    private ReentrantReadWriteLock balanceLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();

    public void withdraw(double amount) {
        try {
            balanceLock.writeLock().lock();
            this.balance = this.balance - amount;
        }
        finally {
            balanceLock.writeLock().unlock();
        }
    }

    public void deposit(double amount) {
        try {
            balanceLock.writeLock().lock();
            this.balance = this.balance + amount;
        }
        finally {
            balanceLock.writeLock().unlock();
        }
    }

    public double getBalance() {
        try {
            balanceLock.readLock().lock();
            return this.balance;
        }
        finally {
            balanceLock.readLock().unlock();
        }
    }
}

In this case several threads can be reading the balance at a time, but only one thread at a time could change the balance.

share|improve this answer

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