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I have an nested object that I want to update it with values provided by object that contains similar structure but only the properties that I want updated. Creating a new result instead of modifying the initial objects is great too.

    var initial = 
      { 
         a: 1, 
         b : { 
            c : 2, 
            d : 3 
         },
         f: 5 
      }; 

    var update = {
        a: 2,
        b: {
           d: 2
        }
    };         
    function updateFunction (a,b) {  return a+b;};
    var result= 
      { 
         a: 3, // updateFunction (1,2)=> 3
         b : { 
            c : 2, 
            d :5 // updateFunction (3,2) => 5
         },
         f: 5 
      };  
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1  
Just iterate through properties, if typeof x == 'object' perform recursive call, otherwise compare and assign value if !== ... What kind of issue is there here ? What have you tried ? –  GameAlchemist May 5 '13 at 12:16
    
The issue was that I thought that objects are passed by value instead of by reference. –  slobodan.blazeski May 5 '13 at 12:52
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Have not tested fully, but maybe,

assuming objects are simple as stated,

function updateFunction (a,b) {  return a + b;};    

function recurse(initial, update){
    for(prop in initial){
        if({}.hasOwnProperty.call(initial, prop) && {}.hasOwnProperty.call(update, prop)){
            if(typeof initial[prop] === 'object' && typeof update[prop] === 'object'){
                recurse(initial[prop], update[prop]);
            }
            else{
                initial[prop] = updateFunction(initial[prop], update[prop]);
            }
        }
    }
}
recurse(initial, update);

EDIT

If result is expected without changing initial

function updateFunction (a,b) {  return a + b;};

function recurse(initial, update){
    var result = {};
    for(prop in initial){
        if({}.hasOwnProperty.call(initial, prop)){
            result[prop] = initial[prop];    
            if({}.hasOwnProperty.call(update, prop)){
                if(typeof initial[prop] === 'object' && typeof update[prop] === 'object'){
                    result[prop] = recurse(initial[prop], update[prop]);
                }
                else{
                    result[prop] = updateFunction(initial[prop], update[prop]);
                }
            }
        }    
    }
    return result;
}
var result = recurse(initial, update);

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget hasOwnProperty –  Eric May 5 '13 at 12:21
    
@eric thanks, of course, updated. –  shakib May 5 '13 at 12:26
1  
initial.hasOwnProperty(prop) doesn't cut it - what if one of the keys in my object is hasOwnProperty? You need to use {}.hasOwnProperty.call(initial, prop), as in my answer –  Eric May 5 '13 at 12:27
    
Thanks shakib it works great from my needs. I've changed only initial.hasOwnProperty(prop) to {}.hasOwnProperty.call(initial, prop) as per Eric suggestion. –  slobodan.blazeski May 5 '13 at 12:46
1  
Note that this modifies the original object, whereas mine creates a copy of the parts it changes. –  Eric May 5 '13 at 12:58
show 3 more comments

Here's how I'd do it:

// The parallel to Array.map
Object.map = function(obj, f) {
    var result = {};
    for(k in obj)
        if({}.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, k))
            result[k] = f(k, obj[k]);
    return result;
}

// Takes two objects and uses `resolve` to merge them
function merge(a, b, resolve) {
    return Object.map(a, function(k, a_value) {
        if(k in b)
            return resolve(a_value, b[k]);
        else
            return a_value;
    });
}

// same as above, but recursing when an object is found
function recursive_merge(a, b, resolve) {
    return merge(a, b, function(a_value, b_value) {
        if(typeof a_value == 'object' && typeof b_value == 'object')
            return recursive_merge(a_value, b_value, resolve);
        else
            return resolve(a_value, b_value);
    });
}

result = recursive_merge(initial, update, function(a, b) { return a + b; })
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Only you might consider cloning a_value objects even if they have no respective property in b - of course, that depends on the OPs exact needs. –  Bergi May 5 '13 at 12:27
    
@Bergi: I see what you mean –  Eric May 5 '13 at 12:29
    
I can't run your code rmerge is not defined, throws error at result = rmerge(initial, update, function(a, b) { return a + b; }) ReferenceError: rmerge is not defined result = merge(initial, update, function(a, b) { return a + b; }) ReferenceError: v is not defined result = recursive_merge(initial, update, function(a, b) { return a + b; }) –  slobodan.blazeski May 5 '13 at 12:41
    
@user1851442: Whoops - fixed –  Eric May 5 '13 at 12:43
    
Thanks works great now –  slobodan.blazeski May 5 '13 at 12:56
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