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I'm developing an Android real-time-data app that sends data (floats and ints) to a server on the local subnet via a TCP socket. The problem I'm facing is that after sending some data simultaneously the socket doesn't send anymore data at all. I debugged the app and it shows that data is being sent but doesn't show up on the server. After this happens if I close the connection the server doesn't even get the notification that the connection has been terminated which it should according to my design model. Meanwhile I get an exception on the app saying it can not write to a broken pipe. This tells me that the problem is with the app because I also did test using a desktop app and I can send huge amounts of data to the server and it gets delivered.

And please keep in mind that the data size I'm talking about here is 252 bytes per packet.

Here's my class I'm using. (This runs in an AsyncTask object )

    public class Network
{
    private Socket handle;
    public static enum TASK
    {
        TASK_CONNECT, TASK_SEND, TASK_CLOSE 
    }
    public Network()
    {

    }
    public String lastError = "";
    public boolean Connect(String host, int port)
    {
        try
        {
            lastError = "Connecting to server.";
            handle = new Socket(host, port);

            handle.setTcpNoDelay(true); //                         
            handle.setSendBufferSize(SIZE_OF_PACKET);  ///==> These don't seem to help at all
            handle.setKeepAlive(true); ///                          

            return true;
        }catch(IOException e)
        {
            lastError += e.getMessage() != null ? " "+ e.getMessage() : "";
            return false;
        }
    }
    private void err(String e){
        System.err.println(e);
    }

    private boolean SendPacket(byte buffer[])
    {
        OutputStream oStream = null;
        err("sending: " + buffer.length + " bytes");

        try
        {
            lastError = "Obtaining output stream.";
            oStream = handle.getOutputStream();

            lastError = "Error sending data.";
            oStream.write(buffer);

            oStream.flush();

            return true;
        }catch(Exception e)
        {
            lastError += e.getMessage() != null ? " "+ e.getMessage() : "";
        }
        return false;
    }

    public void Close()
    {
        try{ handle.close(); handle = null; }catch(Exception e){} // swallow exception
    }
}

I send my data in a loop depending on how many numbers I have. I tried a Google search but didn't find anything relevant. Has anyone experienced this before? It's making me mad now.

EDIT: Wireshark shows incoming "red" packets that don't reach the desktop app (server) Look at this picture. enter image description here You can see the first few have Len > 0 the red ones have 0.

I think it's time Google interfaced the USB so we can use it. At least that'd would have been my first option.

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BTW: .66 is Phone (client) and .65 is Laptop (server). –  chx101 May 6 '13 at 1:42
    
Setting the send buffer size to the size of a packet is futile. You're better off either leaving it alone or increasing it beyond the default. And if you get any IOException using a socket other that a SocketTimeoutException you must close it. –  EJP May 6 '13 at 2:00
    
Yes. That's done in a different class that instantiates the Network() class via the call {object}.Close(). When each Network method returns I check for the returned value (true/false) then close the socket depending on what method I called (i.e SendPacket() since the socket was opened before) –  chx101 May 6 '13 at 2:07
    
That doesn't sound like you've done anything of the sort. The socket should be closed in the catch block. –  EJP May 6 '13 at 8:48
    
You say that you've debugged the program and data is being sent but not received at the server, then we need the server code to tell you what might be wrong. You posted the part that, as you said, is working fine. –  ja_mesa May 8 '13 at 10:20

2 Answers 2

Should you not be calling oStream.close() after you flush the stream, given that you never use it again?

Also, you say that this is being run in an AsyncTask object. Is it possible that multiple threads could be attempting to send packets at the same time? If so, you might need some form of synchronisation around the SendPacket method.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not close to my computer right now but I think you just shed some light here. I need to add some sort of lock. Also each AsyncTask I create destroys itself in the AsyncTask.onPostExecute(). I forgot you can't spell multithreading without lock. I'll come back and possibly mark your answer –  chx101 May 5 '13 at 14:57
    
Nope. Thread synchronization doesn't work either. So after it hangs and I exit out of the app and turn off Wi-Fi the exceptions start showing up. The threads actually end up getting stuck in memory. I mean each thread terminates after it sends its packet. So I think it has to with the socket that somehow it's blocking making the threads clog up. –  chx101 May 6 '13 at 1:18

Ok. I solved the issue by using UDP instead. Thank you all. But I still didn't find the source of the problem.

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