Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
add_index :section_edits, ['admin_user_id', 'section_id' ]

add_index :sections, [:name, :page_id]

I know the variables are different, but my question is regarding how to pass the variables (i.e. :page_id vs 'page_id'). Does it makes a difference? Which one is better?

I have noted that when I use :name it is already defined before I pass the variable, but if I use 'section_id' , following a tutorial, this variable was not previously defined.

Here is some sample code:

class CreateSections < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :sections do |t|

      t.references :page
      t.string :name
      t.string :content_type
      t.integer :position
      t.boolean :visible
      t.text :content

      t.timestamps
    end
    add_index :sections, [:name, :page_id]
  end
end   

class CreateSectionEdits < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :section_edits do |t|
      t.references :admin_user
      t.references :section

      t.timestamps
    end

    add_index :section_edits, ['admin_user_id', 'section_id' ]
  end
end

Thank you!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The documentation for add_index describes column_name (the parameter in question) to be a Symbol or Array of Symbols, so those are the correct (and therefore better) types to be using. The fact that other argument types produce the same results should be viewed as an implementation side-effect not to be counted on. (You can see why strings currently work as well as symbols by following the source code.)

I'm not sure what you mean by the :name and 'section_id' variables being previously defined, since :name is a symbol and 'section_id' is a string literal and neither can be used as a variable. If you're referring to the variables name and section_id, they are unrelated to the corresponding symbols and strings, so whether they are defined or undefined is inconsequential.

Don't mean to be nit-picky with the above answers, but you were asking about specifics and I was just trying to be clear. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for such a good answer. Let me see if I have it straight. Let me refer to them correctly as parameters. When I use :page_id , this means I am sending this parameter which is a reference to a column in my table to the add_index method. On the other hand, if I pass the string parameter "page_id" , the implementation would recognize I am referring to the column called :page_id and therefore this is why it works. Again thanks for the answer. I was using the Lynda tutorial on Rails and noticed they were using them interchangeably and I wasn't sure why. –  Prussian May 5 '13 at 20:37
    
To tell you the truth, I wasn't sure about "parameter" vs. "argument" and found rorguide.blogspot.com/2011/06/… to guide my response in terms of that terminology. :-) There were other results returned by Google, though, so I don't know if that reference is definitive. As for your explanation, yes, the symbol :page_id and the string 'page_id' work identically as arguments for the column_name parameter with the current implementation. :-) –  Peter Alfvin May 6 '13 at 1:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.