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I came up with this "magic string" to meet the ID3 tagging specification:

The ID3v2 tag size is encoded with four bytes where the most significant bit (bit 7) is set to zero in every byte, making a total of 28 bits. The zeroed bits are ignored, so a 257 bytes long tag is represented as $00 00 02 01.

>>> hex_val = 0xFFFFFFFF
>>> str.format('0b{0:07b}{1:07b}{2:07b}{3:07b}', ((hex_val >> 24) & 0xEF),
                                                 ((hex_val >> 16) & 0xEF), 
                                                 ((hex_val >>  8) & 0xEF),
                                                 ((hex_val >>  0) & 0xEF))
'0b11101111111011111110111111101111'

Why does it not equal:

'0b11111111111111111111111111111111'

?

If anyone cares, this seems to work:

>>> int(str.format('0b{0:07b}{1:07b}{2:07b}{3:07b}', ((hex_val >> 24) & 0xFE),
                                                     ((hex_val >> 16) & 0xFE),
                                                     ((hex_val >>  8) & 0xFE), 
                                                     ((hex_val >>  0) & 0xFE)), 2)
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1  
>>> str.format('0b{0:07b}{1:07b}{2:07b}{3:07b}', ((hex_val >> 24) & 0x7F), ((hex_val >> 16) & 0x7F), ((hex_val >> 8) & 0x7F), ((hex_val >> 0) & 0x7F)) '0b1111111111111111111111111111' Sorry, getting my E and 7s confused. –  bsl Oct 28 '09 at 17:11
    
Write it as an answer! –  Carl Norum Oct 28 '09 at 17:12

3 Answers 3

I think you are confusing the and and the or operations.

  • bitwise and: return a number with only bits that are in both operands set.
  • bitwise or: return a number with bits that are in either of the operands set.
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Sorry getting my 7s and Es confused

Corrected code:

>>> str.format('0b{0:07b}{1:07b}{2:07b}{3:07b}', ((hex_val >> 24) & 0x7F),
                                                 ((hex_val >> 16) & 0x7F),
                                                 ((hex_val >>  8) & 0x7F),
                                                 ((hex_val >>  0) & 0x7F))
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You should correct the question rather than add an answer (sorry to contradict the other advice, I guess Carl thought you were someone other than the original poster). (Oh, and I think kaizer.se has the right answer). –  Scott Griffiths Oct 29 '09 at 14:18

It does not equal all ones because you're masking out the 4th bit using the & operator!

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