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Here is my code to look for a frequent number in a large array. It works fine for 500,000. Could anyone help me and tell me why does it crash for n = 2,000,000?

I tried changing int to long or double but it crashes/doesn't let me compile.

Thanks a bunch!

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std;

int main() {

int n=500000;
int A[n];
clock_t begin, end; // this is used for measuring the running time
double elapsed_secs;
int ans;


for (int i=0; i<=0.1*(n-1); i++){
    A[i]=n-i;               
}

for (int i=0.1*n; i<n; i++){
    A[i]=1;  
}


/* Now we run the first algorithm, which is always correct.
 */

begin = clock(); // start couting the time
ans = almostUnanimousAlwaysCorrect(A, n);
end = clock(); // end counting the time
elapsed_secs = 1000*double(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
cout << endl << "(1) The first algorithm (which is always correct) answers "<<endl;

if (ans==1) cout << "1 (correct)\n";
else  cout << "no frequent number (wrong) \n";

cout << "Time taken for the first algorithm is " << elapsed_secs << " milliseconds." << endl<<endl;


/* Now we run the second algorithm, which is NOT always correct.
   Note that the sorting function change how A looks. So, in principle,
   we should reset A. But let's not worry about that for now.
 */

begin = clock(); // start couting the time
ans = almostUnanimousRandom(A, n);


end = clock(); // end counting the time
elapsed_secs = 1000*double(end - begin) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
cout << endl << "(2) The second algorithm (which is NOT always correct) answers "<<endl;
if (ans==1) cout << "1 (correct)\n";
else  cout << "no frequent number (wrong) \n";

cout << "Time taken for the second algorithm is " << elapsed_secs << " milliseconds." << endl<<endl;


system("pause");


}
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're running out of memory on the stack. Allocate it on the heap instead:

int n=500000;
int* A = new int[n];

and then when you're done with it:

delete[] A;
share|improve this answer
    
thanks a bunch! –  Candy Man May 5 '13 at 16:37
    
@CandyMan No problem - don't forget to accept if it worked –  nullptr May 5 '13 at 16:39
    
yup . 30 sec more! –  Candy Man May 5 '13 at 16:42
    
Let's teach proper C++: const int N = 500000; std::vector<int> A(N);. No chance to miss the delete[], not even if an exception happens. –  MSalters May 6 '13 at 8:24
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