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I have a function that gets an object of 'A', it's called: func. I send it an object of B.

Shouldn't it activate the constructor of B? cause I send an object of B although I have to send an object of A. I really don't know why this function prints:

A()
DESTRUCTOR A

and not:

CONSTRUCTOR A
CONSTRUCTOR B
B()
DESTRUCTOR B
DESTRUCTOR A

doesn't it have to multiply the object B because the func gets A a and not A& a?

this is my code:

class A
{
  public:
    A() { cout << "CONSTRUCTOR A\n"; }
    ~A() { cout << "DESTRUCTOR A\n"; }
    virtual void f() { cout << "A()" << endl; }
};

class B: public A
{
  public:
    B() { cout << "CONSTRUCTOR B\n"; }
    ~B() { cout << "DESTRUCTOR B\n"; }
    virtual void f() { cout << "B()" << endl; }
};

void func(A a) {
    a.f();
}

int main() {
    B b;
    func(b);
    return 0;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because if you send son but the function asks for the father class it treats the child as a father.

class A
{
  public:
    A() { cout << "CONSTRUCTOR A\n"; }
    ~A() { cout << "DESTRUCTOR A\n"; }
    virtual void f() { cout << "A()" << endl; }
};

class B: public A
{
  public:
    B() { cout << "CONSTRUCTOR B\n"; }
    ~B() { cout << "DESTRUCTOR B\n"; }
    virtual void f() { cout << "B()" << endl; }
};

void func(B a) {
    a.f();
}

int main() {
    B b;
    func(b);
    return 0;
}

if you try this code you see the result you expect.

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Is it related to slicing? –  Alon Shmiel May 5 '13 at 17:28
1  
Yeah! absolutely –  Aryan May 5 '13 at 17:36
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I think the reason that you are confused is because you are passing by value instead of a pointer. That is why the B object is being treated as an A, since func takes a value of A it treats the object as A by default, which also means that the wrong destructor is being called.Run this code and you will understand better.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class A
{
  public:
    A() { cout << "CONSTRUCTOR A\n"; }
    ~A() { cout << "DESTRUCTOR A\n"; }
    virtual void f() { cout << "A()" << endl; }
};

class B: public A
{
  public:
    B() { cout << "CONSTRUCTOR B\n"; }
    ~B() { cout << "DESTRUCTOR B\n"; }
    virtual void f() { cout << "B()" << endl; }
};

void func(A * a) {
    a->f();
}

int main() {
    B * b = new B();;
    cout << "\n";
    func(b);
    cout << "\n";
    delete b;
    return 0;
}

This is basically the point of virtual functions, when using inheritance you want to able able to pass everything in as a parent class pointer. However the method you want called is the child classes method. When you pass by value the object has to be treated as what it is passed in as.

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