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I'm surprised that Enumerator#each doesn't start off at the current position in the sequence.

o = Object.new

def o.each
  yield 1
  yield 2
  yield 3
end

e = o.to_enum
puts e.next
puts e.next
e.each{|x| puts x}
# I expect to see 1,2,3 but I see 1,2,1,2,3
# apparently Enumerator's each (inherited from Enumerable) restarts the sequence!

Am I doin' it wrong? Is there a way to maybe construct another Enumerator (from e) that will have the expected each behavior?

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I'm not entirely sure why you expect to see 1,2,3 - you will see 1,2,1,2,3 if you start with e.g. an array [1,2,3] instead of your example, so your object construction is fine, but if you do e.each{|x| next if x < 3; puts x; }, it would only output 3 in the loop. next and each are not interacting in the way you expect. –  Neil Slater May 5 '13 at 18:30
    
@NeilSlater I expect #each to take the Enumerator state into account because, well, it's a method on the Enumerator. I am surprised that the Enumerator#each is essentially giving me the same behavior as the original Object's #each did. –  Bill Burcham May 6 '13 at 0:19
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You're not doing it wrong, that's just not the semantics defined for Enumerator#each. You could make a derivative enumerator that only iterates from current position to end:

class Enumerator
  def enum_the_rest
    Enumerator.new { |y| loop { y << self.next } }
  end
end

o = Object.new
def o.each
  yield 1
  yield 2
  yield 3
end

e = o.to_enum
=> #<Enumerator: ...>
e.next
=> 1
e2 = e.enum_the_rest
=> #<Enumerator: ...>
e2.each { |x| puts x }
=> 2
=> 3

And, BTW, each doesn't restart the sequence, it just always runs over the entire span. Your enumerator still knows where it is in relation to the next next call.

e3 = o.to_enum
e3.next
=> 1
e3.next
=> 2
e3.map(&:to_s)
=> ["1", "2", "3"]
e3.next
=> 3
share|improve this answer
    
Would this be even a little better: class Enumerator; def each_remaining; return enum_for(__method__) unless block_given?; loop{ yield self.next};end;end –  Bill Burcham May 6 '13 at 0:25
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Enumerator#next and Enumerator#each work on the object differently. Per the documentation for #each (emphasis mine):

Iterates over the block according to how this Enumerable was constructed. If no block is given, returns self.

So #each always behaves based on the original setup, not on the current internal state. If you quickly peak at the source you'll see that rb_obj_dup is called to setup a new enumerator.

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Interestingly, enumerators don't seem support dup once they have advanced from the start: e=o.to_enum; e.dup works without complaint, e=o.to_enum; e.next; e.dup gets "TypeError: can't copy execution context" –  dbenhur May 5 '13 at 20:09
    
@dbenhur Yeah, I don't have a good grasp on why that would be. My guess would be that it's probably an issue with the fiber instantiated under the hood. The behavior for dup may be ambiguous once you've called next. Do you create a new fiber at the same point, did you just want a dup of the original state, etc? –  Aaron K May 5 '13 at 20:18
    
Thanks for pointing out that documentation @AaronK. I had read that but you made me read it again and now I understand it. I still think it's wrong for Enumerator#each to fail to take into account the Enumerator state. I would be happier if the behavior and the doc changed :) –  Bill Burcham May 6 '13 at 0:20
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