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Here is a simple convex example.

http://jsfiddle.net/swY5k/

#test{
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background: #888888;
    border-radius: 50px;
}

However, I want a concave border radius.

I tried making the border-radius negative but this did not work.

Example of concave/convex:

enter image description here

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found it ... jsfiddle.net/cogent/6A5Lb ... uses convex to create concave. –  user1637281 May 5 '13 at 19:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can give the impression of a concave border using radial gradients on the background. For example, something like this:

#test {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background: #888888;
    background:
      radial-gradient(circle 20px at -20% 50%,transparent,transparent 100px,#888888 100px),
      radial-gradient(circle 20px at 120% 50%,transparent,transparent 100px,#888888 100px);
    background-size:100px 200px, 100px 200px;
    background-position:0 0,100% 0;
    background-repeat:no-repeat;
}

Note that most webkit browsers still require prefixes for radial-gradients, and if you want to fully support older browsers you may need to implement the older gradient syntax too.

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2  
Can't see any border at all when I chuck that into JSFiddle. Am I missing something? (Edit Ah I do in IE. Guess it needs some vendor prefixes on Chrome) –  Martin Smith May 5 '13 at 19:30
    
Yes, I should have mentioned that. I'll update the answer. –  James Holderness May 5 '13 at 19:45

With clever use of the :before and :after pseudo classes, we can simulate a concave form:

#test{
    width: 100px;
    height: 300px;
    background: green;
    position: relative;
    display: inline-block;
}

#test:before{
    background: white;
    height: 300px;
    width: 30px;
    border-radius: 0 60px 60px 0 / 0 300px 300px 0;
    display: inline-block;
    content: '';
}

#test:after{
    background: white;
    height: 300px;
    width: 30px;
    border-radius: 60px 0 0 60px / 300px 0 0  300px;
    display: inline-block;
    content: '';
    position: relative;
    left: 40px;
}

The #test div is a plain rectangle. But its :before and :after elements are half-side concave filled with the background color (white in this case).

See this jsfiddle.

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1  
+1, I read the question, thought 'hey this would be a funny use case to fake it with :before and :after', then saw your answer hehe - nice one. –  Niels Keurentjes May 5 '13 at 20:29
    
Thanks :) BTW: This should even work with Chrome/Firefox 4.0+, IE 9+, Opera 10.5 (even though I haven't tested them all). –  tessi May 5 '13 at 20:33
    
Hahaha, this is amazing. +1 –  ArleyM May 5 '13 at 20:56
    
The downside to this method is that the underlying background won't show through the concave areas. You couldn't use something like this on top of an image for example. –  James Holderness May 6 '13 at 14:16

I suggest using border-image, with a scalable SVG image in the border.

That way you can have any shape you want in the border; no need to be restricted to the shapes offered by border-radius, and no need to do any clever hacks or extra markup either.

The down-side is that neither border-image nor SVG is supported in older browsers (ie old IE versions). But of course, border-radius isn't either, so you don't lose much with this technique, compared with the flexibility you gain.

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