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After upgrading from django 1.3 to django 1.5 I started to see these DeprecationWarnings during the test run:

path_to_virtualenv/lib/python2.6/site-packages/django/http/request.py:193: DeprecationWarning: HttpRequest.raw_post_data has been deprecated. Use HttpRequest.body instead.

I've searched inside the project for raw_post_data and found nothing. So it was not directly used in the project. Then, I've manually went through INSTALLED_APPS and found that raven module still uses raw_post_data and it was the cause, but..

Is it possible to see the cause of DeprecationWarning during the test run? How to make these warnings more verbose?

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Can you show how you make the request? There must be something accessing the raw_post_data property even though it shouldn't. –  Simeon Visser May 5 '13 at 22:18
    
It's simply self.client.get(url, params). I'm pretty sure it's not relevant, because I do make such requests in many test methods, but only this one causes the warning to appear. So I guess this is because something is imported in libs that causes the warning. Thank you, anyway. –  alecxe May 5 '13 at 22:26
1  
I see. Are you importing anything in libs that is related to Django or requests / views ? In Django 1.5 the raw_post_data property is not accessed but something could be analysing the request by iterating over all properties. Perhaps mock? Or something in libs? –  Simeon Visser May 5 '13 at 22:28
    
There is a bunch of imports in libs, but nothing related to requests/views, except that there is from django.conf import settings. And..here it is: raven is the cause - figured it out manually. Thank you, but I still want to know if I could have seen the cause during the test run somehow. I'll update the question. –  alecxe May 5 '13 at 22:36
    
FYI, I've generalized the question. –  alecxe May 5 '13 at 22:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is taken from a similar question.

You can use the warnings modules to raise an error for DeprecationWarning.

Temporarily add the following snippet to the top of your project's urls.py:

import warnings
warnings.simplefilter('error', DeprecationWarning)

The DeprecationWarning will now raise an error, so if debug=True you'll get the familiar yellow Django error page with the full traceback.

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1  
Yes, I've seen this, but, unfortunately, it doesn't work - when I add this to urls.py or settings.py I don't see warnings during the test run at all. I'll try to figure out why and accept the answer if it works. Thank you for participation. –  alecxe May 8 '13 at 9:27
    
good luck with it –  SunnySydeUp May 8 '13 at 12:31
    
Try adding it to your manage.py? –  Ben Burns May 8 '13 at 18:48
    
Found it, the problem was in raven itself. It was eating all type of exceptions while accessing raw_post_data - that's why I saw warnings and I didn't see exceptions at the same place (see source). So, provided solution works. Thank you! –  alecxe May 9 '13 at 10:42
    
@SunnySydeUp, decided to accept your answer, but to give a bounty award to hynekcer for his awesome alternative solution. Hope it seems fair to you too. –  alecxe May 9 '13 at 10:45

You can set Python warning control by command line option -W to raise an exception with a traceback on DeprecationWarning like for errors instead of normal simple warning once. Any specific warning can by filtered by message, category, module, line or by a combination of them.

Examples:

python -W error:"raw_post_data has been deprecated" manage.py test

python -W error::DeprecationWarning manage.py test

python -W error:::django.http.request manage.py test

A fine filtering is useful if you want to fix all warnings of one type together by batch editing in many files of a big project.


Python 2.7 and higher ignores DeprecationWarning usually if they are not reanabled, e.g. by -Wd option or by the environment variable export PYTHONWARNINGS="d". That can be useful on development machines but not on production.

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Thank you for the answer - it's very nice and clean..and awesome! –  alecxe May 9 '13 at 10:44

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