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I have written the code to reverse a string. I think the logic is correct. I can compile it, but I am unable to run it. I am trying to use MinGW on windows. Can someone point out what the problem might be?

 void reverse(char * start, char * end){
    char ch;
    while(start != end){
        ch = *start;
        *start++ = *end;
        *end-- = ch;
    }
 }

 int main(){
    char *c = (char *)"Career";
    int length = strlen(c);
    reverse(c,c+length-1);
 } 

Thanks

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1  
So, your subject says it won't compile, but the body says you CAN compile but can't run. Which is it, and can you be more specific about the problem you are having? Also note that char *c = (char *)"Career"; will be a read-only string in memory. Try declaring it as a char c[] = .... –  Joe May 6 '13 at 1:11
1  
"Can someone point out what the problem might be?" -- Yes: the problem is your poor description and your failure to state what error you're getting. –  Jim Balter May 6 '13 at 1:12
    
And after you make it modifiable, use std::reverse. –  chris May 6 '13 at 1:16
    
Well I just get "a.exe" stopped working.. –  Fox May 6 '13 at 1:18
    
Which language? C or C++? –  David Heffernan May 6 '13 at 1:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are passing a literal to your function and attempting to modify literals is undefined behaviour.

Make a modifiable string like this:

char c[] = "Career";

On top of that, reverse only works when you have an odd number of characters in your string. Your while condition is wrong. It should be:

while(start < end)

Your code said:

while(start != end)

and if your string has an even number of characters, that condition is always true. Hence the loops until you get a segmentation fault because start and end point outside the input string.

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Thanks for the help .. –  Fox May 6 '13 at 1:24

You cannot change a string literal since it's placed in read-only memory.

Try declaring c as char c[] = "Career";

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I made the changes but still it is not running .. I just get -- "a.exe" stopped working .. no error .. –  Fox May 6 '13 at 1:22

The reason your code did not compile is that you need to add

#include <string.h>

to the top of the file, to define the strlen function.

Also

while(start != end){

generates a

Segmentation fault (core dumped)

error for strings that are an even number of characters long.

Change this to

while(start < end){

and that error will go away.

Here's a complete working version:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

 void reverse(char * start, char * end){
    char ch;
    while(start < end){
        ch = *start;
        *start++ = *end;
        *end-- = ch;
    }
 }

 int main(){
    char c[] = "Career";
    int length = strlen(c);
    reverse(c,c+length-1);
    printf("c=%s\n", c);
 }
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