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var myObject = (function(){

  var value = 0;

  return {
    getValue: function(){
      return value;
    }
  }

}());



var myObject = (function(){

  var value = 0;

  return {
    getValue: function(){
      return value;
    }
  }

})();

The execution seems to return the same Object. i.e., myObject contains

  {{
    getValue: function(){
      return value;
    }
  }}

in both the cases.

I know something like (function(){})() executes because (function(){}) is an expression which returns a function and the trailing () executed the function being returned.

But why does this execute (function(){}()) ? I was expecting a syntax error here.

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marked as duplicate by Dagg Nabbit, Matt Ball, squint, РСТȢѸФХѾЦЧШЩЪЫЬѢѤЮѦѪѨѬѠѺѮѰѲѴ, Sindre Sorhus May 6 '13 at 7:53

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also fwiw this is syntatically valid because the open paren disambiguates from a function expression (as per the spec), which is why function(){}() is a syntax error but (function(){}()) isn't –  kieran May 6 '13 at 4:00
    
Actually function(){}() doesn't seem to be an error. I tried this after posting the question. jsbin.com/ayujud/1/edit. And I think that essentially means the enclosing () are ignored in the first case. Correct me if I am wrong. –  ShaggyInjun May 6 '13 at 4:01
    
Both of your examples turn the function definition into a function expression instead of just a function definition. The JS parser needs to know which it is so it doesn't get it wrong. –  jfriend00 May 6 '13 at 4:02
    
@ShaggyInjun oh yeah true, the assignment makes it unambiguous, I was just trying a naked function call, you're right though –  kieran May 6 '13 at 4:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The phrases are functionally identical, the placement of the () is something of a matter of taste and I've see directions to do either in favour of the other. Personally I prefer

(function() { ... }());

That form, creates the function and executes it inside of the parenthesis.

(function() { ... })();

Creates the function inside of the parenthesis and then executes it.

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They are identical.

As for why (function(){}()) doesn't give a syntax error but function(){}() does, I think it's because the parser, when encountering function will think it is a function declaration rather than a function expression, but then when it sees (), it complains since function declarations have to have a name. But when it sees ( first before function there's no way this is a function declaration, so it thinks it is a function expression.

For (function(){})(), you simply enclosed the function expression in brackets before calling it.

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