Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a simple game in javascript and I'm wondering what the best way to handle collisions between the player and the world objects.

<script>

var isJumping = false;
var isFalling = false; 
var w = 1;
var recwidth = 400;
var recheight = 400;
var xpos = 50;
var ypos = 279;
window.onload = function() {
    var FPS = 30;
    var ground = new myObject();
    setInterval(function() {
        clear();
        draw();
        ground.draw(0, 325);
        ground.draw(125,325)
    },     1000/FPS);
};

function myObject(){ 
    this.draw = function drawground(groundx, groundy){
        var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas')
        var  context = canvas.getContext('2d');
        //context.fillRect(xpos,ypos,100,100);
        var img=new Image()
        img.src="ground.png"
        img.onload = function() { 
        context.drawImage(img,groundx,groundy)}

    }

};




function jump()
{
    var t=.1;
    isJumping=true;

    var jumpint= setInterval(function() {
        yup = 12*t-(5*t*t);
        ypos= ypos - yup;
        t = t + .1
        if(yup < 0)
        {
            isJumping = false;
            isFalling = true;
            clearInterval(jumpint);
            jumpint = 0;
            fall();
            return;
        }

    }, 20);

}

function fall()
{
    t=.10
    var fallint= setInterval(function() {
        ydown = (5*t*t);
        ypos= ypos + ydown;
        t = t + .1
        if(ypos > 275)
        {
            isFalling == false;
            clearInterval(fallint);
            fallint = 0;
            return;
        }

    }, 20);

}



function changex(x){
    xpos = xpos + (x);
    //clear();
    //draw();
}
function changey(y){
    ypos = ypos + (y);
    //clear();
    //draw();
}



function draw(){
    var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas')
    var  context = canvas.getContext('2d');

    var img=new Image()
    img.src="character.png"
    img.onload = function() { 
        context.drawImage(img,xpos,ypos)}

}

function clear(){
    var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas')
    var  context = canvas.getContext('2d');
    context.clearRect(0,0, canvas.width, canvas.height);
}


document.onkeydown = function(event) {
    var keyCode; 

    if(event == null)
    {
        keyCode = window.event.keyCode; 
    }
    else 
    {
         keyCode = event.keyCode; 
    }

    switch(keyCode)
    {
    // left 
    case 37:
        //left
        changex(-5);
        break; 

    // up 
    case 38:
        // action when pressing up key
        jump();
        break; 

    // right 
    case 39:
        // action when pressing right key
        changex(5);
        break; 

    // down
    case 40:
        // action when pressing down key
        changey(5);
        break; 

    default: 
        break; 
    } 
}
</script>

So, as you can see I'm creating two objects so far, and the player stops falling at any arbitrary point. I feel collisions at this stage wont be too difficult, but once I start adding more I feel it's going to get more difficult. I'm not going to be using the instance of the object with the same image for each instance of the object, so at some point I'm going to change the myobject function to be able to accept the image as a parameter, and then checking for collisions will be a bit more tricky. I also plan on making this into a side scroller, so once one end the map is hit it changes into the next area, which is going to cause performance issues. If I'm checking for collisions on every single object in the entire game every interval I imagine things are going to get slow. What is going to be the best way to limit the number of collisions checked? Obviously, if the object isn't on screen there is no need to check it, but is there a way to limit that. I'm thinking of making an array for every frame of the game, and filling that array with it's objects. Then, only check the array the of the frame the player is currently in. Is this feasible or still going to cause too many issues? Any help is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
A common solution: quadtrees (2d)/octrees (3d). –  Matt Ball May 6 '13 at 4:20
    
Check this SO thread and look at this quadtree implementation. As @Matt said, it's a common (and effective) solution. –  Gustavo Carvalho May 6 '13 at 9:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.