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I'm trying to write a convention test that specifies that a method should only be called in some contexts - specifically I have a static Empty getter that I only want to allow used in test methods, vis methods decorated with TestAttribute.

I know that I should also mark the getter as obsolete, use another method etc, but I also want a convention test around this so it doesn't break in the future.

I am guessing I want to use static analysis through reflection in my convention test. How would I go about performing this kind of analysis?

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1  
Reflection won't provide implementation details (body) of your methods. You should use something similar to Roslyn. I suggest to add tag roslyn to your question, so that you will receive help from it's team, as Eric Lippert did with stackoverflow.com/questions/15891197/… – Ilya Ivanov May 6 '13 at 5:04
    
@Ilya done, cheers – Ben Scott May 6 '13 at 5:12

Yes, Roslyn can help with this sort of thing. An example of what this might look like as a standalone analysis would be something like:

var solution = Solution.Load(pathToSolution);
foreach (var project in solution.Projects)
{
    var type = project.GetCompilation().GetTypeByMetadataName(typeNameContainingMethod);
    var method = type.GetMembers("Empty").Single();
    var references = method.FindAllReferences(solution);
    foreach (var referencedSymbol in references)
    {
        foreach (var referenceLocation in references)
        {
            CheckIfCallIsAllowed(referenceLocation);
        }
    }
}

You might also look at the Creating a Code Issue walkthrough and the Code Issue template that comes with the Roslyn CTP for another approach to doing this at edit time, instead of in a test.

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