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I'm experimenting with Ember.js, Node.js and MongoDB. I've based my noodling on the excellent video on the Ember site and Creating a REST API using Node.js, Express, and MongoDB. I've hit a roadblock on the Ember.js side trying to get my create record functionality working.

Currently, when a user creates a record in my sample application, two will show up in the listing. This is happening because when I save my record to the server, a new ID is created for that record by MongoDB. When the response is returned (containing the object with the new ID), the record is duplicated until I refresh the page. One has the new Mongo-supplied ID and the other has a NULL.

Here is where I create the new object:

App.NewwineRoute = Ember.Route.extend({
   model: function() {
          return App.Wine.createRecord();
   }
});

Here is where I store the record to MongoDB:

App.NewwineController = Ember.ObjectController.extend({
    doneEditing: function() {
        this.get('store').commit();
        this.transitionToRoute('wines');
    }
});

I'm curious what the best way to handle this is when using ember-data? I've tried all kinds of tricks and worn my connection out searching for examples.

The closest I've been is a nasty hack of setting an id of -1 to the new object/record and then attempting to remove it after the commit. Sadly, the object/record wouldn't really be removed, just show up blank in my list. Plus, I couldn't create any objects/records with an id of -1 from that point on (because one already exists). Seems like a dead-end.

Thanks in advance.

>'.'<

SOLUTION:

I was able to glean the solution to the problem from the following AMAZING examples:

Ember.js CRUD REST

Node.js REST Server for Ember

For others that have had the ID problem, the App.Adapter in the above example handles the mapping from "_id" to "id".

App.Adapter = DS.RESTAdapter.extend({
  serializer: DS.RESTSerializer.extend({
    primaryKey: function (type){
      return '_id';
    }
  })
});

Inside of the example's Node.js service, the DB calls map "id" to "_id":

collection.findOne({'_id':new BSON.ObjectID(id)}, function(err, item) {

Thanks again to ddewaele for sending over the example, it was a great tutorial for linking these technologies together.

share|improve this question
    
what versions of ember / emberdata are you using ? Also created a CRUD sample with a nodejs backend and I don't have this behavior (feel free to check github.com/ddewaele/emberjs-crud-rest). The fact that a POST returns the object with its ID is normal and EmberData should be able to handle that. –  ddewaele May 6 '13 at 8:54
    
Are you using the standard primary key field "id" ? –  ddewaele May 6 '13 at 9:41
    
Thanks so much for the prompt response!! I've downloaded your application and server and have it running successfully locally - now it is time to dig in and understand what I was doing wrong. I was doing ID conversion in my Server.js as Ember didn't like the _id. (I was using the latest ember.js and ember-data.js.) –  Brendon Cassidy May 6 '13 at 15:07
    
I'm also using _id (mongoDB). Probably something todo with the DataAdapter primary key config. If something is nog clear in the github repo for the sample just log an issue and I'll take a look. –  ddewaele May 6 '13 at 15:20
    
Thank you so much for the help; your examples were unbelievably instructive. They clearly solve the ID problem and the formatting challenges that I had with the JSON responses. For others that have had the ID problem, your App.Adapter handles the mapping from "_id" to "id". App.Adapter = DS.RESTAdapter.extend({ serializer: DS.RESTSerializer.extend({ primaryKey: function (type){ return '_id'; } }) }); Inside of your Node.js service, the DB calls map "id" to "_id": collection.findOne({'_id':new BSON.ObjectID(id)}, function(err, item) { –  Brendon Cassidy May 6 '13 at 21:17

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