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Hey so I am really stuck with this one query and I am new to SQL and Oracle. So basically have a database with LastName, FirstName, Email, and State. I have another database with the skills that each of the people from the first database have and each skill has an ID number. I need to produce a list of specific people with the specific skill ID ('3') but when I do that, I get redundant information, as in, the same name comes up 3 or 4 times each and I don't want that.

This is the query I used:

SELECT FirstName, LastName, Email
FROM CONSULTANTS, SKILLS
WHERE SKILLS.ExpertiseID = '3' AND CONSULTANTS.STATE = 'NJ' 
OR CONSULTANTS.STATE = 'NY';

Any help would seriously be appreciated

share|improve this question
    
You're missing a foreign key here. The duplicates are coming from this missing key - basically, you're selecting all consultants from NJ or NY and then repeating that for each Skill regardless of who the skill belongs to. – Chris Gessler May 6 '13 at 6:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted
SELECT FirstName, LastName, Email
FROM CONSULTANTS, SKILLS
WHERE SKILLS.ExpertiseID = '3' AND 
( CONSULTANTS.STATE = 'NJ' OR CONSULTANTS.STATE = 'NY' );
GROUP BY FirstName, LastName, Email

Use by GROUP BY to eliminate repetitive rows

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! That worked perfectly. I can't believe I didn't think about using the 'GROUP BY' function – bloodstorm17 May 6 '13 at 6:30
    
glad i could help. plz mark as correct answer .thanks – mudassir hasan May 6 '13 at 6:31
1  
GROUP BY is a band-aid for a poorly-written statement. – APC May 6 '13 at 7:06
    
@APC +1 to you sir.. thanks for your post . will think twice before applying Group By . – mudassir hasan May 6 '13 at 7:08

"I get redundant information, as in, the same name comes up 3 or 4 times each and I don't want that"

That's because you query doesn't have an explicit join between SKILLS and CONSULTANTS. So what you have is a list of all the consultants in New York and New Jersey cross joined with all the skills that have an ID of 3. The fact that you have a product of several records per consultant suggests to me that ExpertiseID is not a unique key but without seeing the data I can't be sure.

The suggestion to use GROUP BY (or DISTINCT come to that) is at beat a kludge and at worst plain wrong, as it still produces the wrong result set (all consultants, not just consultants with that skill). You should fix this the proper way, by using a join which links consultants to the skills they actually have.

Without your data model I can't tell you exactly how to do this, but either there is a foreign key on SKILLS referencing the CONSULTANT primary key - ConsultantID ? - or there is an intersection table joining the two (in an ideal world it would be called CONSULTANT_SKILLS). If you have neither a foreign key nor an intersection table then you have a broken data model, and no chance to getting the desired result set.

share|improve this answer

GROUP BY or DISTINCT are used to remove duplicates, however, I'm not sure how the Skills are actually tied to the Consultant in this case so this query may not be accurate. Is there a many to many table I'm missing or possibly a foreign key in the Skills table? Also note that this missing link is the source of your duplicates so when you get that link figured out, you won't need the GROUP BY or DISTINCT in your query.

SELECT C.FirstName, C.LastName, C.Email
FROM CONSULTANTS C
JOIN SKILLS S ON C.CustomerId = S.CustomerId  -- need a join clause that ties the Skill to the Consultant
WHERE C.STATE IN ('NJ', 'NY') AND S.ExpertiseID = 3;

To fix your original query, simply leave out the skills table.

SELECT C.FirstName, C.LastName, C.Email
FROM CONSULTANTS C
WHERE C.STATE IN ('NJ', 'NY');
share|improve this answer

have give the alias of the given table.. this is a good experience of database.. You can try this query

SELECT c.FirstName, c.LastName, c.Email
FROM CONSULTANTS c, SKILLS s
WHERE s.ExpertiseID = '3' AND c.STATE = 'NJ' 
OR c.STATE = 'NY';
share|improve this answer
    
This is not an answer. Adding table aliases - good practice or not - does not change the logic of the query and so does not fix the problem. – APC May 6 '13 at 8:13

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