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I read through a file once to find the number of lines it contains then read through it again so I can store some data of each line in an array. Is there a better way to read through the file twice than closing and opening it again? Here is what I got but am afraid it's inefficient.

int numOfMappings = 0;
ifstream settingsFile("settings.txt");
string setting;
while(getline(settingsFile, setting))
{
    numOfMappings++;
}
char* mapping = new char[numOfMappings];
settingsFile.close();
cout << "numOfMappings: " << numOfMappings << endl;
settingsFile.open("settings.txt");
while(getline(settingsFile, setting))
{
    cout << "line: " << setting << endl;
}
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2  
SInce you're using c++, you can use a vector instead of an array: cplusplus.com/reference/vector –  Patashu May 6 '13 at 7:00
    
Why not use a vector<> to store the information as you read it from the file the first time - the vector will automatically resize as it needs more memory. –  Michael Burr May 6 '13 at 7:01
    
Have a look here. Probably here actually. –  Chief Two Pencils May 6 '13 at 7:04
    
Are all the lines/entries the same number of bits? –  Chief Two Pencils May 6 '13 at 7:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
settingsFile.clear();
settingsFile.seekg(0, settingsFile.beg);
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It's inefficient, use a std::vector and read through the file once only.

vector<string> settings;
ifstream settingsFile("settings.txt");
string setting;
while (getline(settingsFile, setting))
{
    settings.push_back(setting);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
It may not be appropriate to use this method if file is too big and vector will not fit into memory –  mvp May 6 '13 at 7:07
2  
@mvp: that's true for an array as well. –  Michael Burr May 6 '13 at 7:20

To rewind the file back to its beginning (e.g. to read it again) you can use ifstream::seekg() to change the position of the cursor and ifstream::clear() to reset all internal error flags (otherwise it will appear you are still at the end of the file).

Secondly, you might want to consider reading the file only once and storing what you need to know in a temporary std::deque or std::list while you parse the file. You can then construct an array (or std::vector) from the temporary container, if you would need that specific container later.

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Just use:

settingsFile.seekg(0, settingsFile.beg);

This will rewind file pointer to the very beginning, so you can read it again without closing and reopening.

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3  
Nice to see an answer that actually answers the question instead of the ever present default answer when someone sees an array - "...vector...". +1 –  Chief Two Pencils May 6 '13 at 7:09
    
This doesn't work. while(getline(settingsFile, setting)) never happens. –  Celeritas May 6 '13 at 7:25
2  
@Celeritas that's because eofbit is still set. Call file.clear() before the loop. –  jrok May 6 '13 at 7:43
    
@jrok thanks, under the hood is this better than just .close() and .open() the file again? –  Celeritas May 6 '13 at 16:42
    
@Celeritas It certainly makes more sense than reopening :) –  jrok May 6 '13 at 16:45

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