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I'd like to limit my query to show only rows where a certain field is not empty. I found this thread where someone posed the same question and was told to use IS NOT NULL. I tried that, but I'm still getting rows where the field is empty.

What is the correct way to do this? Is Null the same thing as Empty in SQL/MySQL?

My query, if you're interested is: SELECT * FROM records WHERE (party_zip='49080' OR party_zip='49078' OR party_zip='49284' ) AND partyfn IS NOT NULL

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can you post some sample data – ling.s May 6 '13 at 7:18
    
Unfortunately I cannot post actual data from my tables as it contains sensitive info. You can write some with just the 2 rows easily though if you'd like to test. – cream May 6 '13 at 7:20
3  
Take a look at this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1869264/… – joakaune May 6 '13 at 7:23
    
Thanks I got it – cream May 6 '13 at 7:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

When comparing a NULL value, the result in most cases becomes NULL and therefor haves the same result as 0 (the FALSE value in MySQL) inside WHERE and HAVING.

In your given example, you don't need to include IS NOT NULL. Instead simply use party_zip IN ('49080', '49078', '49284'). NULL can't be 49080, 49078, 49284 or any other number or string.

What you do need to think about though, is when checking for empty values. !party_zip won't return TRUE/1 if the value is NULL. Instead use OR columns IS NULL or !COALESCE(party_zip, 0)

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I got it by using AND (partyfn IS NOT NULL AND partyfn != '')

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