Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have my website cached using full page caching. So for every page an html file is created.

As I am using CakePHP, I can define that APC caching would be used instead of file caching. However, if done that, html files are still being created (APC is installed correctly).

So question: is there any logic in using APC with full page caching? Does it give any benefits? Is it possible to put cached html file to RAM somehow and read it from there when needed?

P.S. I am not talking about APC opcode caching functionality. Just data caching.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

Yes, you can cache whole your HTML view file in cache with APC cache engine in CakePHP. Cake's CacheHelper will do that job for you. Suppose you have a PostsController and you want to cache all your view files related this controller. In this case first of all you have to define the following code in your controller.

   class PostsController extends AppController {
       public $helpers = array('Cache');
   }

And in your bootstrap.php file you have to add the CacheDispatcher.

   Configure::write('Dispatcher.filters', array(
        'CacheDispatcher'
       )
   );

And now again in your PostsController you have to tell about the cache files.

    public $cacheAction = array(
        'view' => 36000,
        'index'  => 48000
    );

This will cache the view action 10 hours, and the index action 13 hours.

I think from now on you can serve your whole HTML cached view file to your visitors without hitting PHP or Cake in your server. Thanks.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually CakePHP does not cache views in APC. It caches views as files in app/tmp/cache/views/. APC is only used to cache models, data… See how the CacheDispacher works. –  iDev247 Nov 1 '13 at 5:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.