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I have two files (file1.txt & file2.txt ) , files are only examples .

How to merge the two files , in order to create the file - merge_files.txt as example 3

I writing now ksh script , so merge can be done with ksh,awk,sed,perl one liner ...etc

Background - why I need to merge the files : my target is to rename the OLD file (exist in first field) to NEW file (exist in second field) ,

example1

more file1.txt

/etc/port1-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0
/etc/port2-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0
/etc/port3-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0
/etc/port4-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0
/etc/port5-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0
.
.
.
.

example2

more file2.txt

/etc/port1-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port2-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port3-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port4-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port5-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
.
.
.
.

example3

 more merge_files.txt



 /etc/port1-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0  /etc/port1-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
 /etc/port2-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0  /etc/port2-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
 /etc/port3-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0  /etc/port3-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
 /etc/port4-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0  /etc/port4-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
 /etc/port5-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0  /etc/port5-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
 .
 .
 .
 .
 .

example4 (merge_files.txt structure)

 first field                           second field

 OLD file                              NEW file
share|improve this question
    
Are the two files always the same length? (your final goal is only to rename files, and you will delete the merge_files.txt after renaming the files?) – MisterJ May 6 '13 at 7:43
    
No this is only example ( length or PATH can be more diffrent ) and file content may be diff also ( no need to delete the merge_files.txt ) – user1121951 May 6 '13 at 7:45
up vote 58 down vote accepted

You can use paste to format the files side by side:

$ paste -d" " file1.txt file2.txt
/etc/port1-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port1-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port2-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port2-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port3-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port3-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port4-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port4-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
/etc/port5-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port5-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0

E.g.:

$ paste -d" " file1.txt file2.txt | while read from to; do echo mv "${from}" "${to}"; done
mv /etc/port1-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port1-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
mv /etc/port2-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port2-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
mv /etc/port3-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port3-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
mv /etc/port4-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port4-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0
mv /etc/port5-192.9.200.1-255.555.255.0 /etc/port5-192.90.2.1-255.555.0.0

Of course you would want to throw in some safety checks ([ -f "${from}" ], ...).

Disclaimer: Works only if there are no spaces in your filenames.

share|improve this answer
    
paste command defined in linux and solaris ? , because my script will run on both OS ( linux & solaris ) – user1121951 May 6 '13 at 8:42
    
paste is available on any POSIX-com‌​pliant system and both Linux and Solaris ship with it (here is the Solaris man page on Oracle's website), so this is a portable solution. – Adrian Frühwirth May 6 '13 at 11:54
    
How can I paste the files side by side, without the space in between? i.e., use paste -d" " file1.txt file2.txt - without the space delimiter? - Thanks in advance! – Vikas Goel Sep 17 '14 at 7:34
1  
@AdrianFrühwirth Thanks! – Vikas Goel Sep 20 '14 at 20:36
1  
Thanks, saved me at least half an hour – ᐅdevrimbaris Jun 11 '15 at 8:52

This Perl one-liner will display the renames necessary

perl -e 'open $f[$_-1], "file$_.txt" for 1,2; print "rename @n\n" while chomp(@n = map ''.<$_>, @f)'

If this works for you then replace the print statement with a real rename and use

perl -e 'open $f[$_-1], "file$_.txt" for 1,2; rename @n while chomp(@n = map ''.<$_>, @f)'

to do the actual renaming

share|improve this answer

if paste doesnt work, double check that the newline formats are correct (e.g., dos vs unix "txt" files) -- I had this problem recently in cygwin in windows. dos2unix made everything work...

share|improve this answer
    
Nice suggestion, but the question is asking about programmatic merging, not copy-paste manually. – CindyH Jun 6 at 21:54

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