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I'd like to split a dataframe in 4 equals parts, because I'd like to use the 4 cores of my computer.

I did this :

df2 <- split(df, 1:4)
unsplit(df2, f=1:4)

and that

df2 <- split(df, 1:4)
unsplit(df2, f=c('1','2','3','4')

But the unsplit function did not work, I have these warnings messages

1: In split.default(seq_along(x), f, drop = drop, ...) :
  data length is not a multiple of split variable
...

Do you have an idea of the reason ?

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1  
For this I think you can nicely use plyr. It supports multicore processing, e.g. using ddply. –  Paul Hiemstra May 6 '13 at 7:47
1  
There is no need for you to split your dataframe in order to parallelize your operations. Just use something like lapply(seq(nrow(df)), function(i) {...}) along with R's built-in parallel package. Or is there any urgency for you to manually split your data? –  fdetsch May 6 '13 at 7:51
    
I think you really do not want to process row by row (4 rows at a time). Unless each row takes very long (> few seconds), the overhead of parallelisation will cause the analysis to become even slower. –  Paul Hiemstra May 6 '13 at 7:53
    
Yes, I just do it in order to parallelize my operations. I'm sorry Paul Hiemstra, I don't understand your last comment. Even with ddply it's not good ? –  Ricol May 6 '13 at 7:54
    
Stephane @PaulHiemstra won't see the comment unless you mention them using the @ symbol to ensure they get a notification that you posted on your question. (sorry Paul!) –  Simon O'Hanlon May 6 '13 at 11:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How many rows in df? You will get that warning if the number of rows in your table is not divisible by 4. I think you are using the split factor f incorrectly, unless what you want to do is put each subsequent row into a different split data.frame.

If you really want to split your data into 4 dataframes. one row after the other then make your splitting factor the same size as the number of rows in your dataframe using rep_len like this:

## Split like this:
split(df , f = rep_len(1:4, nrow(df) ) )
## Unsplit like this:
unsplit( split(df , f = rep_len(1:4, nrow(df) ) ) , f = rep_len(1:4,nrow(df) ) )

Hopefully this example illustrates why the error occurs and how to avoid it (i.e. use a proper splitting factor!).

## Want to split our data.frame into two halves, but rows not divisible by 2
df <- data.frame( x = runif(5) )
df

## Splitting still works but...
## We get a warning because the split factor 'f' was not recycled as a multiple of it's length
split( df , f = 1:2 )
#$`1`
#         x
#1 0.6970968
#3 0.5614762
#5 0.5910995

#$`2`
#         x
#2 0.6206521
#4 0.1798006

Warning message:
In split.default(x = seq_len(nrow(x)), f = f, drop = drop, ...) :
  data length is not a multiple of split variable


## Instead let's use the same split levels (1:2)...
## but make it equal to the length of the rows in the table:
splt <- rep_len( 1:2 , nrow(df) )
splt
#[1] 1 2 1 2 1


## Split works, and f is not recycled because there are 
## the same number of values in 'f' as rows in the table
split( df , f = splt )
#$`1`
#         x
#1 0.6970968
#3 0.5614762
#5 0.5910995

#$`2`
#         x
#2 0.6206521
#4 0.1798006

## And unsplitting then works as expected and reconstructs our original data.frame
unsplit( split( df , f = splt ) , f = splt )
#         x
#1 0.6970968
#2 0.6206521
#3 0.5614762
#4 0.1798006
#5 0.5910995
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