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We like our production environment with a restricted/unchangable schema -- the development side can be owned by the developers and changed as they like -- and we like to vet changes as they are promoted.

I'm wondering if this may be a solution to making that happen:

postgres% create proddb with owner=postgres;

unixside% pg_restore --dbname=devdb [--schema-only] --no-owner proddb
/* grants to users on schema objects appear to remain intact */

/* here's the magic, I hope... */
postgres% revoke create on schema public from public;
postgres% grant usage on schema public to produser(s);

Some testing seems to show that a user in this new proddb can interact with tables normally (with appropriate grants) and cannot alter the schema (alter table, create table, drop table, etc). But I'm paranoid and very new to Postgres, so...

Q: Is this correct?

Q: Am I missing anything?

Thanks muchly.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, that is correct. The only addition is that the owner of a table can always delete or modify it. So it may not work if you have existing tables in the schema.

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Understood. There never should be an owner of a table in production if I do this right: everything should be owned by postgres from inception. Thanks. –  Joe Creighton Oct 28 '09 at 21:36

Discovered a missing element: sequences.

The user was finding errors in his scripts; similar errors appeared in the logs:

ERROR:  permission denied for sequence <sequence>

The production schema showed that although sequences were created, they were owned by postgres and no explicit grants were given to the users. As per the GRANT documentation:

Granting permission on a table does not automatically extend permissions to any sequences used by the table, including sequences tied to SERIAL columns. Permissions on sequence must be set separately.

Our fix (verbose for this demonstration) was to find all sequences:

unixside% pg_dump --schema-only proddb > proddb.schema
unixside% grep -i 'create sequence' proddb.schema

...and apply appropriate grants (select to prevent table scans, update to prevent the above errors):

postgres% grant select,update on <sequence> to produser(s);

So far, the user says it's working and errors to the log have stopped...

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I forget what version PostgreSQL added the syntax, but one of the easiest ways to administer permissions in PostgreSQL is through the "GRANT foo, priv ON ALL something IN SCHEMA" syntax.

BEGIN;
GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE ON ALL TABLES IN SCHEMA my_schema TO my_role;
GRANT USAGE ON ALL SEQUENCES IN SCHEMA my_schema TO my_role;
GRANT EXECUTE ON ALL FUNCTIONS IN SCHEMA my_schema TO my_role;
COMMIT;

Very handy for making sure that permissions are always set correctly.

The EXECUTE for FUNCTIONS may seem spooky, but shouldn't be unless your functions were created with the SECURITY DEFINER attribute (and if you are using SECURITY DEFINER, you'd better be cautious since you're playing around with the PostgreSQL version of a "setuid" function). If you space out your TABLES across different SCHEMAS based on the expected permissions, then this becomes a pretty handy convention when used with the search_path variable.

ALTER ROLE my_role SET search_path = my_schema, auth_schema, public;
-- Avoid using the public schema (pretty please)

Where auth_schema has a collection of tables that my_role shouldn't have direct read or write privileges on. Assigning privs to GROUPS is also useful.

Here are some relevant docs:

http://developer.postgresql.org/pgdocs/postgres/sql-grant.html

Don't forget you can use "\h GRANT" in psql to easily figure out the syntax or remember what can be done on all objects in a schema (search for "IN SCHEMA").

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The following is in 9.1 (but not 8.4 where I currently sit)... "There is also an option to grant privileges on all objects of the same type within one or more schemas. This functionality is currently supported only for tables, sequences, and functions (but note that ALL TABLES is considered to include views and foreign tables)." Thanks, though. –  Joe Creighton Jun 20 '11 at 15:17

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