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I confuse between 2 operation:

if(!is_active)
{
  do something here...
}

AND

if(is_active == false)
{
  do something here...
}

Which is it faster than another? And if faster, then why is it faster. Can you explain in bit operator with 0 and 1.

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3  
If this is the performance bottleneck of your program, I would like to tip my hat to you! You have an excellent optimized piece of software there, well done. –  JustSid May 6 '13 at 8:40
6  
If one was faster than the other, what do you think a compiler would do when encountering the slow version? I know what my compiler would do: it'd replace it with the fast version. It usually pays to assume that your compiler vendor is not severely brain damaged. If doing something would be extremely stupid, they're probably not doing it. –  jalf May 6 '13 at 8:40
2  
The second makes you look like a newbie. –  john May 6 '13 at 8:42
1  
the first is faster. Faster to type that is, on any keyboard that has the ! character accessible. wrt runtime performance of the program I think there are enough answers by now. –  Arne Mertz May 6 '13 at 8:45
1  
@ArneMertz Oh I don't know, you have to reach for that shift key, and then recover when you find you hit the control key, or even worse the CAPS LOCK. –  john May 6 '13 at 8:46
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8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Both are equivalent. You can test this yourself by using the -S option, which produces assembler output into file.s. With gcc on amd64 you get for example

file.cpp:

void f()
{
    bool is_active = false;
    if(!is_active) { dosomething(); }

    if(is_active == false) { dosomething(); }
}

file.s:

...
    movzbl  -1(%rbp), %eax
    xorl    $1, %eax
    testb   %al, %al
    je  .L3
    call    _Z11dosomethingv
.L3:
    movzbl  -1(%rbp), %eax
    xorl    $1, %eax
    testb   %al, %al
    je  .L2
    call    _Z11dosomethingv
.L2:
...

You can easily see that the code is the same for both instances.

Update to Charles Bailey's comment including compiler optimization -O2

file.cpp:

extern bool is_active;

void f()
{
    if(!is_active) { dosomething(); }
}

void g()
{
    if(is_active == false) { dosomething(); }
}

file.s:

    cmpb    $0, is_active(%rip)
    je    .L4
    rep
    ret
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L4:
    jmp    _Z11dosomethingv
...
    cmpb    $0, is_active(%rip)
    je    .L7
    rep
    ret
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L7:
    jmp    _Z11dosomethingv

The produced assembler code is different this time, but as expected it's same for both if statements.

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Are you compiling with optimization? I performed the same test and the generated code performed no comparisons, one call and jmp. Trivially the same test can be used in both instances and, furthermore, can be trivially optimized out. (is_active is a local variable whose address is not taken, in your example, so the call to dosomething cannot affect it.) This is not a good test of the code generated in two different cases. –  Charles Bailey May 6 '13 at 8:52
    
@CharlesBailey As with optimization, you can also put as much effort into an example as you wish. It remains a fact, that the code produced is the same. Even in your case, where everything is optimized away, in both cases. –  Olaf Dietsche May 6 '13 at 8:58
    
I'm sorry, I obviously didn't make my point clear. It's pointless to compare the two cases without compiler optimizations enabled (this isn't putting effort in, IMHO, this is just choosing the correct options for compiling 'release' code). Your test is invalid for two reasons. First, the variable being testing is initialized with a constant value so the compiler can take advantage of this in a way that it can't in general for the question being asked; second, by putting the two test cases in a single function the compiler can make optimizations that cross the boundaries of the two cases. –  Charles Bailey May 6 '13 at 9:04
    
@CharlesBailey Ok, I see your objection now. The main point, I wanted to show is how the OP can test this himself. Anyway, I added another example, which shows the same assembler code with optimization turned on. –  Olaf Dietsche May 6 '13 at 9:13
    
@Olaf Dietsche: thank you so much, i didn't know how to change my code to assembler code, but your answer is very clearly. –  Gigagon May 6 '13 at 9:14
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When compiled, they'll produce the same machine code. It's just a matter of syntax.

From the standard (5.3.1):

The operand of the logical negation operator ! is implicitly converted to bool (clause 4); its value is true if the converted operand is false and false otherwise. The type of the result is bool.

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Technically, in C++ you could redefine the behavior of the operator == to make it access a database or compute Bitcoin hashes, which would make the == version slow :) So yes, assuming default types, they should generate the same code, if it's custom types then it could be different. A good (real life) example would be testing a pointer for nullity, some smart pointer classes are doing heavy tests to validate that, making the code non trivial. –  Mickaël Pointier May 6 '13 at 8:44
    
@Mickaël Pointier: if is_active was a smart pointer (or any non-intrinsic type for that matter), !is_active wouldn't be a valid expression. But yes, the == operator can be "slow". –  someguy May 6 '13 at 8:53
    
Would not !is_active be a valid expression if there was a bool conversion defined for the type? –  Mickaël Pointier May 6 '13 at 9:11
    
@Mickaël Pointier: I'm an idiot. For some reason, I thought you couldn't overload the logical negation operator :p. –  someguy May 6 '13 at 9:13
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There is no easier way, than try for yourself :) Write simple program tha uses both and measure time. I think, that It can be compiler and optimalization specific .

However... trying to optimize this piece of code is useless... you are focusing on wrong optimalization :)

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When your compiler does not optimize it to be exaclty the same you have a really dumb compiler.

But if one of them is faster, then if(!is_active), because it only needs one ASM INV command instead of LOAD and CMP.

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Unoptimized, the first is a negation followed by a comparison to zero; the second is a comparison followed by a comparison to zero.

Optimized they are almost certainly the same.

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The answer to this question is highly dependent on the compiler's ability to understand code - compilation templates. Basically, you are asking the same binary question - is the variable is_active equal 0; yet you are asking it in two different manners:

  1. is it equal the fixed value of 0
  2. is it anything other than 0

A smart compiler (and a supporting Assembly ISA) will not perform the logical not and then compare to 0, rather it will compare to the value not equaling 0 in the first place.

To make a long story short, assuming your compiler is even semi-intelligent and the ISA supports comparing to a value not being 0; it should be the exact same

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I recommend you never use

if ( is_active == false )

Instead you could use:

if ( false == is_active ) or if ( !is_active )

but not for efficiency reason.

A common mistake for beginners is write == as =. (Sometimes I also have such typo too). In the former case, this mistake results in a legal assignment. In the latter, the compiler will complain about the mistake, because you can never assign anything to false

Hope this also helps :)

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It's a bad practice to write like this:

if(is_active == false)

Don't do this.

And about speed of such operation... We're in 2013. ;-)

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