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I'm not to sure about something about EventWaitHandle.Set. When called from within current thread and there is another thread waiting for the event, do the current thread get to sleep so that other thread gets to run (ASAP)?

I'm asking because in some of my code I have to add some object to a "threads shared" queue and that operation has really to go as quick as possible. But in the other thread where that queue is being used, speed is "not required". So I'm proceeding like this:

        // Speed "not required"
        mailThread = new Task(() =>
        {
            for (; ; )
            {
                MailMessage mail;
                pushMailLockMREvt.WaitOne();
                {
                    if (mails.Count == 0)
                    {
                        mail = null;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        mail = mails.Dequeue();
                    }
                }
                pushMailLockMREvt.Set(); // Does this put current on sleep on lower it's priority??

                if (mail != null)
                {
                    try
                    {
                        MailClient.Send(mail);
                    }
                    catch (Exception exe)
                    {
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    mailSem.WaitOne();
                }
            }
        });

        [...]

        // Speed required
        var task = new Task(() =>
        {
            pushMailLockMREvt.WaitOne(); // ASAP please...
            {
                mails.Enqueue(mailMessage);

                if (mails.Count == 1)
                {
                    mailSem.Set();
                }
            }
            pushMailLockMREvt.Set();
        });
share|improve this question
    
No, the current thread will not sleep just because it signals the wait handle. But it may relinquish the rest of its timeslice (that's pretty subtle and low-level and isn't something you should rely on). You should not need to take any special action. – Matthew Watson May 6 '13 at 9:21
    
Then is there any reason I should not just use lock statements instead of the EventWaitHandle? – Serge May 6 '13 at 9:25
up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, the current thread will not sleep just because it signals the wait handle. But it may relinquish the rest of its timeslice (that's pretty subtle and low-level and isn't something you should rely on). You should not need to take any special action.

It is probably the case that the thread that has just finished waiting will get a brief boost in thread priority.

See this documentation for the Windows API function SetThreadPriorityBoost() from which I quote:

When a thread is running in one of the dynamic priority classes, the system temporarily boosts the thread's priority when it is taken out of a wait state.

Also see this documentation.

So the thread that just woke up from the wait should (normally) get a small boost. I'm not totally sure that this also applies to managed threads, but I seem to remember reading somewhere that it does. I can't find the source of that, though.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you suggest I put "Thread.Sleep()" to raise the oods the "speed requiring" thread get its hands on resources? – Serge May 6 '13 at 9:27
    
Yes, Thread.Sleep(0) is a valid thing to do in such circumstances. It explicitly means "relinquish the rest of my current timeslice". Only a parameter value of zero means that - anything larger means to wait for that long as normal. – Matthew Watson May 6 '13 at 9:28
    
However note that the advice used to be to use Sleep(1) rather than Sleep(0), however things have changed since Windows XP so that's no longer true. You might still want to use Thread.Sleep(1) but you should instrument your build to see if it really helps. – Matthew Watson May 6 '13 at 9:41

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